working copy staff web 2017 (toc.03)

1. WORKPLACE POLICIES (includes all policies and signature page–list alphabetically)  
 1-1 Affirmative Action Policy
 1-2 Americans with Disabilities Act
 1-3 Code of Ethics
 1-4 Communications Policy
 1-5 Confidentiality
 1-6 Conflict of Interest
 1-7 Drug and Alcohol Policy
 1-8 Equal Employment Opportunity 
 1-9 Guidelines Regarding Work Attire
 1-10 Harassment
 1-11 Inclement Weather/Closing Policy
 1-12 Non-Discrimination Policy
 1-13 Religious Accommodation Policy
 1-14 Religious Non-Affiliation
 1-15 Recruitment, Hiring, and Promotion Policy
 1-16 Safe Sanctuary Policy
 1-17 Scent-Free Policy
 1-19 Smoke-Free Workplace Policy
 1-20 Staff Travel Reimbursement Policy
 1-21 Use of CCWRC’s Vehicle and Transportation Policy
 1-22 Whistle Blower
 1-23 Workplace Violence Policy
 1-24 Policy Signature Page
2. RECRUITMENT, HIRING, AND DEVELOPMENT  
Recruitment 2-1
Selection 2-2
Family or Romantic/Sexual Relationships as a Matter of Concern in Regard to CCWRC Employment 2-3
Employee Orientation and Development 2-4
3. PERSONNEL PROCEDURES  
Preliminary Evaluation Period for All Staff 3-1
Annual Performance Evaluations for All Staff 3-2
Grievances  3-3
Disciplinary Action 3-4
Resignation or Termination 3-5
Personnel Records for All Staff 3-6
Personnel Procedures Relating to the Executive Director 3-7
4. EMPLOYEE CLASSIFICATION AND DEFINITIONS  
Classifications 4-1
Process for Classification Review and Adjustment 4-2
5. SALARY ADMINISTRATION AND COMPENSATION  
Hours of Work: Regular Work Week 5-1
Compensation for Hours Worked Beyond 40 5-2
Hotline Coverage 5-3
Reimbursement for Expenses Incurred While Providing Direct Service 5-4
Reimbursement for Attendance at Conferences, Meetings, and Workshops 5-5
Cost of Living Increases  5-6
6. BENEFITS  
Employees Assuming A New Position Within the Organization 6-1
Sick Leave 6-2
Temporary Medical Leave Without Pay 6-3
Leave Bank 6-4
Vacation Leave 6-5
Paid Holidays for Full-Time Staff 6-6
Personal Leave for Full-Time Staff 6-7
Bereavement Leave for Full-Time Staff 6-8
Child-Rearing Leave for Full-Time Staff 6-9
Other Leaves of Absence for Full-Time Staff 6-10
Insurance Benefits 6-11
7. JOB DESCRIPTIONS  
Administrative Assistant 7-1
Advocacy Center Advocate 7-2
Assistant Director of Shelter Services 7-3
Assistant Executive Director – Chief Operating Officer 7-4
Bookkeeper 7-5
Children’s Advocate 7-6
Director of Administration and Chief Financial Officer 7-7
Director of Counseling and Advocacy Services 7-8
Director of Outreach and Education 7-9
Director of Residential Services 7-10
Director of the Child Access Center 7-11
Director of the Civil Legal Representation Project (CLRP) 7-12
Director of Volunteer Programs 7-13
Executive Director 7-14
Facilities Manager 7-15
Legal Advocate-Counselor 7-16
Overnight-Weekend Shelter Counselor 7-17
Paralegal 7-18
Prevention Educator 7-19
Prevention Educator – Part-Time 7-20
Sexual Assault and Legal Advocate 7-21
Shelter Counselor 7-22
Special Projects Coordinator 7-23
Staff Attorney 7-24
Supervised Visitation Monitor 7-25
Training Coordinator 7-26
Transitional Housing Advocate 7-27
Triage Advocate – Americorp 7-28
Victim Centered Intensive Case Management (VCICM) Field Advocate 7-29
Visitation and Exchange Advocate 7-30
Volunteer Counselor 7-31
8. EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE EVALUATIONS/PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT TOOL (PMT)
Performance Management Tool Overview Version 2.0 8-1
  Administration PMT 8-2
  Client Services PMT 8-3
  Client Support – Admin Assistant PMT 8-4
  Client Support – Bookkeeper PMT 8-5
  Client Support – Legal PMT 8-6
  Client Support – Outreach PMT 8-7
  Volunteer PMT 8-8
  Support Forms 8-9
  360 Degree Feedback Recommended Contributors 8-10
 
 
8. FORMS AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Board Member List FORMS-1
  Check Request FORMS-2
  COBRA Notification Letter FORMS-3
  Conference or Workshop Request FORMS-4
  Confidentiality Agreement (Visitor) FORMS-5
  Document Retention Policy and Document Retention Schedule FORMS-6
  Employees Receipt of Handbook FORMS-7
  FMLA Leave Request Form FORMS-8
  Leave Bank FORMS-9
  New Employee Orientation Checklist  FORMS-10
  Organizational Chart FORMS-11
  Out of Office Request FORMS-12
  Reference Waiver FORMS-13
  Threat Report FORMS-14
  Travel and Expense Reimbursement Voucher FORMS-15
  Vacation Cash-In Form FORMS-16
    FORMS-17
   other forms–employee contact form, donation tax receipt, credit card donation, redbook refills?,

add history, philosophy

 

WORKPLACE POLICIES

Affirmative Action Policy

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors 1/17/17

The Centre County Women’s Resource Center (CCWRC) is committed to equity in all its programs and services.  As part of that commitment, the CCWRC recognizes that it is important to address the implicit bias inherent in all organizations.  Consequently, the CCWRC will actively encourage and support diversity in gender, race/ethnicity, color, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, religion, age, national origin, marital status, veteran status and ability among the Board of Directors, staff and volunteers in order to provide culturally competent services to our clients.

Specifically, it is the policy of the CCWRC to provide equal opportunities in all volunteer and employment positions without regard to race/ethnicity, color, religion, sex/gender, national origin, age, ability status, marital status, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, genetic information or any other protected characteristic under applicable law. This policy relates to all phases of employment and volunteering, including, but not limited to, recruiting, employment, placement, promotion, transfer, demotion, reduction of workforce and termination, rates of pay or other forms of compensation, selection for training, the use of all facilities, and participation in all company-sponsored employee and volunteer activities. Provisions in applicable laws providing for bona fide occupational qualifications, business necessity or age limitations will be adhered to by the CCWRC where appropriate.

As part of the company’s equal employment opportunity policy, CCWRC will also take affirmative action as called for by applicable laws and Executive Orders to ensure that people of color, persons with varied gender, gender identities and expressions, sexual orientations, disabled veterans, recently separated veterans, other protected veterans, Armed Forces service medal veterans, and qualified disabled persons are introduced into our workforce and considered for promotional opportunities.

Employees and applicants shall not be subjected to harassment, intimidation or any type of retaliation because they have (1) filed a complaint; (2) assisted or participated in an investigation, compliance review, hearing or any other activity related to the administration of any federal, state or local law requiring equal employment opportunity; (3) opposed any act or practice made unlawful by any federal, state or local law requiring equal opportunity; or (4) exercised any other legal right protected by federal, state or local law requiring equal opportunity.  All employees and volunteers will agree in writing to the CCWRC Non-discrimination Policy.

The above-mentioned policies shall be periodically brought to the attention of supervisors and shall be appropriately administered. It is the responsibility of each supervisor of the organization to ensure affirmative implementation of these policies to avoid any discrimination in employment. All employees are expected to recognize these policies and cooperate with their implementation. Violation of these policies is a disciplinary offense.

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Americans with Disabilities Act

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors 10/18/16

If you believe yourself to be disabled for purposes of federal or state law and in need of a reasonable accommodation to perform your essential job functions, please submit a written request for the accommodation you desire to your immediate supervisor, so that CCWRC can begin the interactive exchange process with you.  The Center County Women’s Resource Center (CCWRC) is not required to implement accommodations which cause undue hardship to CCWRC.

Policy Statement: It is the policy of CCWRC to provide reasonable accommodation, as part of our equal employment opportunity policy, to qualified current and potential employees who are either temporarily or permanently disabled. All employees in accommodated situations MUST adhere to CCWRC Personnel Policies, Procedures and Practices including attendance. Failure to do so may result in disciplinary actions up to and including termination of employment.

Applicability: All CCWRC employees and potential employees.

Provisions:

A.  For employees or potential employees with permanent disabilities: CCWRC will endeavor to provide a reasonable accommodation to a qualified applicant or employee with a known physical or mental disability unless that accommodation will impose an undue hardship on the organization.

It is the obligation of the qualified individual with a disability to request such accommodation. All requests must be in writing and submitted to both the supervisor and Director of Administration.

Reasonable accommodations may be modification or adjustment to a job, employment practice, or work environment to make it possible for an otherwise qualified individual to have equal employment opportunity.

Reasonable accommodations will be made only to qualified individuals with a disability who are employees or applicants. The term “qualified individual” means an individual with a disability who, with or without reasonable accommodation, can perform the essential functions of the position that such an individual holds or desires.

Reasonable accommodation will be considered based on the specific abilities and functional limitations of the particular individual with the disability and the specific functional requirement of the job.

If the proposed accommodation is one that will impose undue financial hardship on the organization, CCWRC will be under no obligation to honor such request. However, the individual with the disability has the option of providing the accommodation or paying a portion of the cost that constitutes undue hardship to the organization. Other options may also be discussed.

Also, a qualified individual with a disability has the right to refuse an accommodation. However, if the individual cannot perform the essential functions of the job without the accommodation, (s)he may not be qualified for that job.

The Director of Administration and supervisor will work closely with the current employees who request reasonable accommodation to provide such accommodation as long as it will not constitute undue hardship on the organization. In such cases the employee is expected to accept any reasonable accommodation chosen by the employer. Employees who are offered a position or accommodation and refuse to accept the position or accommodation will be deemed as having voluntarily resigned. .

B.  For current employees experiencing temporary disabilities not related to a work injury or illness: CCWRC will try to temporarily accommodate employees with temporary disabilities. Employees should work with their supervisors to see if accommodation is possible based on the organization’s needs. All requests for temporary accommodation must be in writing along with a doctor’s note specifying the work restrictions and accommodation sought.

Employees on temporary disability may be required to provide periodic medical updates to their supervisor about the status of their disability and estimated date of return to regular duties. Employees who cannot be accommodated may request a Temporary Medical Leave as described in the Employee Policies and Procedures.

After an employee has exhausted their personal leave of absence and are still not able to return to work, their employment at CCWRC may or shall be terminated.

C.  For current employees experiencing temporary disabilities due to work related injury or illness: CCWRC is required to provide accommodations for employees who are temporarily disabled due to a work injury or illness and who have been released to return to modified duties for up to 6 months. During that period, the employee’s regular position may not be filled except temporarily. If the employee is returned to full duty within the 6-month period, (s)he will be returned to their regular duty.

Employees may be required to provide regular updates to their supervisor periodically during this accommodation period.

If the accommodation period is exhausted and the employee is still not capable of returning to regular duties, the Director of Administration and the Assistant Executive Director will work with the employee and CCWRC Directors to try and locate another position for the employee. A position will be offered to the employee if it has been determined that the employee is capable of performing or might be capable of performing the essential duties of a new job within a 3-month period.

If a suitable position is located, the employee will obtain the approval of the treating physician as to the employee’s capabilities to function in the new position.

In some cases, it may be necessary to cross-train the employee in order to enhance skills or teach new skills. In such instances, employees are required to fully cooperate with cross-training efforts.

The employee in this category is expected to accept any reasonable accommodation chosen by the employer. Employees who are offered a position and refuse to accept that position will be deemed as having voluntarily resigned. In addition, a petition will be filed with the Workers’ Compensation Bureau to terminate the employee’s workers’ compensation claim based on the refusal.

After 6 months of temporary disability, if the employee is still not able to return to full duty or a regular position could not be located within CCWRC, their employment will be terminated. Workers’ Compensation benefits will be provided to such employees as outlined by Pennsylvania law. The terminated employee is obligated to notify the Director of Administration in the event that they are able to secure other employment outside CCWRC.

Benefits eligibility for injured employees in accommodated duties will be based on prior (pre-injury) full-time or part-time status.

adopted on October 18, 2016 by the CCWRC Board of Directors

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Code of Ethics

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors,  April 19, 2011

This Code of Ethics is intended to serve as a guide.  This code represents standards of ethical behavior for all Centre County Women’s Resource Center (CCWRC) paid and volunteer staff in the relationships they have with those they serve, with colleagues, with the agency, with other individuals, and with the community and society as a whole.

This code is based on fundamental values and principles that are the common ground CCWRC providers share.  These values include commitment to service, the dignity and worth of the person, integrity, competence, social justice, confidentiality, self-determination and the importance of human relationships.

This code does not represent a set of rules that will prescribe all the behaviors of people in the complexities of their lives.  Rather, it offers general principles for the assessment and appraisal of situations that present ethical dilemmas, and guides the conduct of CCWRC paid and volunteer staff.  This code of ethics is designed to work in correspondence with the Employee Policies and Procedures (EP&P) of the CCWRC.  While specific references to the Policies and Procedures are noted throughout this document, in general, violations of the Code of Ethics are considered to be serious breaches of professional conduct and may be grieved or result in disciplinary action.

  1. ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITY TO CLIENTS

1.01 Commitment to Clients

The primary responsibility of the CCWRC paid and volunteer staff is to promote the well-being of clients.

1.02 Self-Determination

CCWRC paid and volunteer staff respect and promote the right of clients to self-determination and assist clients to identify and pursue their goals.

1.03 Information about Services

CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall inform clients, in a manner understandable to the clients, of the purpose of the services, risks related to the services, reasonable alternatives, clients’ right to refuse or withdraw from services, the time frame covered by the services and the procedure for grievance.  In instances where clients lack the capacity to provide informed consent, staff shall protect clients’ interests by seeking permission from an appropriate third party, informing clients in a manner understandable to the clients.  In such instances staff shall seek to ensure that the third party acts in a manner consistent with the clients’ wishes and interests.  CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall take reasonable steps to enhance such clients’ ability to give informed consent.

1.04 Competence

CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall provide services and represent themselves as competent only within the boundaries of their education, training and certification.  Paid and volunteer staff shall only provide services within the boundaries of their program’s standards.

1.05 Cultural Competence and Social Diversity (EP&P, Section I. B. and Attachment A)

CCWRC paid and volunteer staff in providing services shall be sensitive to social diversity and oppression with respect to race, ethnicity, national origin, color, class, gender, sexual orientation, age, marital status, political belief, religion and mental or physical disability in order to provide service in a manner which is culturally competent and respectful of social diversity.

1.06 Conflicts of Interest

(a)  CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall be alert to and avoid conflicts of interest that interfere with the exercise of professional discretion and impartial judgment.

(b) When CCWRC paid and volunteer staff provide services to two or more people who have a relationship with each other, CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall clarify with all parties the professional obligations to each individual who is receiving services.

(c) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not take advantage of any professional relationship or exploit clients and former clients to further their personal, religious, political or business interests.

(d) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not engage in dual or multiple relationships with clients or former clients with whom there is exploitation or potential harm to the client.

(e) In instances where dual or multiple relationships exist, CCWRC paid and volunteer staff are responsible for setting clear, appropriate and culturally sensitive boundaries.

(f) Individual CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall neither solicit nor accept a private fee or other remuneration for providing services to clients.

1.07 Privacy and Confidentiality   (EP&P, Section I. A.)

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall respect clients’ rights to privacy.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff may disclose confidential information only with valid, informed consent from a client or a party legally authorized to consent on behalf of a client.

(c) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not discuss or disclose information obtained in the course of professional service, except when disclosure is necessary to prevent serious, foreseeable and imminent harm to a client or other identifiable person or when laws require disclosure with or without a client’s consent.

(e) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall inform clients, to the extent possible, about the disclosure of confidential information and the potential consequences.

1.08 Sexual Relationships

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not engage in sexual activities, sexual contact, or inappropriate sexual conversation with clients.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not engage in sexual activities or sexual contact with former clients where there is a risk of exploitation or potential harm to the former client.

(c) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not provide counseling services to individuals with whom they have had a prior sexual relationship.

1.09 Physical Contact

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not engage in physical contact where there is a possibility of psychological or physical harm to the client as a result of the contact.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff who engage in physical contact with clients are responsible for setting clear, appropriate and culturally sensitive boundaries that govern such physical contact.

1.10 Harassment (EP&P, Attachment C. Harassment Policy)

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not sexually harass clients.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not harass, oppress or engage in any other form of violence towards clients; particularly in regards to race, ethnicity, national origin, color, class, gender, sexual orientation, age, marital status, political belief, religion and mental or physical disability.

(c) Refer to signed CCWRC Harassment Policy located in employee files.

1.11 Continuity of Services

CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall take reasonable steps to facilitate the continuity of services to clients in the event that services are interrupted by program staff such as unavailability, relocation, illness, disability or death.

1.12 Termination of Services

CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall terminate services to clients when such services are no longer required or no longer serve the clients’ needs or interest.

1.13 Referral of Services

CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall refer clients to other professionals when the other professionals’ specialized knowledge or expertise is needed to serve clients fully or when victim services program staff believe that they are not being effective or making reasonable progress with clients and that additional service is required.

  1. ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES TO COLLEAGUES (EP& P, Sec.III., C. Grievances)

2.01 Respect

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall treat colleagues with respect, courtesy, fairness and good faith, and shall represent accurately and fairly the qualifications, views and obligations of colleagues. (EP&P, Sec. III.C.2.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall avoid criticism of colleagues in communications with clients, with other professionals, and in public settings.

(c) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall cooperate with colleagues In order to promote the well-being of clients and the program mission.

2.02 Confidentiality

CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall respect confidential information shared by colleagues in the course of their professional relationships and transactions.   CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall ensure that such colleagues have information regarding the CCWRC paid and volunteer staff obligations to respect confidentiality and any exceptions related to it.

2.03 Disputes Involving Colleagues

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall treat colleagues with respect, courtesy, fairness and good faith, and shall represent accurately and fairly the qualifications, views and obligations of colleagues, including is cases of dispute.   (EP&P, Sec. III.C.2.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not take advantage of a dispute between colleagues to obtain a position or otherwise advance the CCWRC paid and volunteer staff’s own interests.

(c) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not exploit clients in disputes with colleagues or engage clients in any inappropriate discussion of conflicts between victim services program staff and their colleagues.

2.04 Consultation

(a) When consulting with colleagues about clients, CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall disclose the least amount of information necessary to achieve the purposes of the consultation, respecting the confidentiality guidelines of the program.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall seek the advice and counsel of colleagues whenever such consultation is in the best interest of the clients.

2.05 Referral for Services

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff who refer clients to other professionals shall take appropriate steps to facilitate an orderly transfer of responsibility.  CCWRC staff who refer clients to other professionals shall disclose, with client’s consent, all pertinent information to the new service providers.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff are prohibited from giving or receiving payment for a referral.

2.06 Sexual Relationship  (EP&P Sec.I,C.2)

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff who function as supervisors or educators shall not engage in sexual activities or contact with supervisees, students, trainees, or other colleagues over whom they exercise professional authority.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall avoid engaging in sexual relationships with colleagues when there is a potential for a conflict of interest.  CCWRC paid and volunteer staff who become involved in, or anticipate becoming involved in, a sexual relationship with a colleague have a duty to transfer professional responsibilities to avoid a conflict of interest.

2.07 Harassment       (EP&P Attachment C.)

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not sexually harass those they supervise, students, trainees or other colleagues.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not harass, oppress or engage in any other form of violence towards those they supervise, students, trainees or colleagues; particularly in regards to race, ethnicity, national origin, color, class, gender, sexual orientation, age, marital status, political belief, religion and mental or physical disability.

(c) Refer to signed CCWRC Harassment Policy located in employee files.

2.08 Unethical Conduct of Colleagues    (EP&P Sec. III. C and D.)

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall take adequate measures to discourage, prevent, expose and correct the unethical conduct of colleagues.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall be knowledgeable about established policies and procedures for handling concerns about a colleague’s unethical behavior.

(c) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff who believe that a colleague has acted unethically shall take action through appropriate channels which include reporting the unethical behavior to his/her supervisor, the supervisor of the colleague suspected of unethical behavior or to the Executive Director.

2.09 Incompetence and/or Impairment of Colleagues       (EP&P Sec. III.D.) 

 (a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff who has direct knowledge of a colleague’s incompetence and/or impairment  that interferes with her/his practice effectiveness shall  report that knowledge to his/her supervisor, to the supervisor of the colleague believed to be incompetent or impaired or to the Executive Director for appropriate action.

  1. ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES IN PRACTICE SETTINGS

3.01 Client Records

CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall ensure that documentation of all records is accurate, appropriate to the services provided, reflects the services provided, and facilitates the continuity of services.

3.02 Assessment

CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall carefully consider the client’s needs before agreeing to provide services and shall assess the client’s risks and benefits before the client enters into a relationship with the agency.

3.03 Supervision and Education   (EP&P Sec. II. D. and Sec. III)

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff who provide supervision or consultation shall have the necessary knowledge and skill to supervise or consult appropriately and shall do so only within their areas of knowledge and competence.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff who provide supervision or consultation shall set clear, appropriate, and culturally sensitive boundaries.

(c) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not engage in any dual or multiple relationships with supervisees with whom there is a risk of exploitation of or potential harm to the supervisees.

(d) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff who provide supervision shall evaluate supervisees’ performance in a manner that is fair and respectful.

(e) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff who function as educators or field instructors for students shall take reasonable steps to ensure that clients are routinely informed when services are being provided by students.

3.04 Education and Training

CCWRC paid and volunteer staff who function as educators or trainers shall provide instruction only within their areas of knowledge and competence, and shall provide instruction based on the most current and accurate information and knowledge available in the profession.

3.05 Commitments to  the CCWRC   (EP&P Sec. I, A-C. and Sec.II,D.3)

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall adhere to commitments made to the CCWRC program.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall work to improve the CCWRC programs, policies and procedures and effectiveness of their services.

(c) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff when making public statements shall clearly distinguish between his/her personal views and positions adopted by the CCWRC program.

3.06 Administration

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall make diligent use of their employing organization’s resources, wisely conserving funds where appropriate and never misappropriating funds or using them for unintended purposes. (EP&P Sec.V,A,D and E)

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff advocate within and outside their organizations for adequate resources to meet client needs.

(c) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall allocate resources that are nondiscriminatory and based on appropriate and consistently applied principles.

(d) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall work to improve the organization’s policies and procedures, as well as, the efficiency and effectiveness of its services.

(e) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall act to prevent and eliminate discrimination in organization work assignments and employment practices. (EP&P, Sec. I.B. and Attachment A)

  1. ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES TO THE COMMUNITY/SOCIETY

4.01 Social Change

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall recognize and challenge myths and attitudes detrimental to victim/survivors of domestic and sexual violence and stalking.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall support social, legal, economic, educational, political and cultural institutions that promote non-oppressive, violence-free environments in all segments of community and society.

(c) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall promote the general welfare of victim/survivors in society including economic and political power to enable survivors to make choices for the betterment of their own lives at all levels of the social system.

(d) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall advocate for the mental and physical well-being of children in society and act to eliminate all exploitation of children.

(e) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall act to expand choice and opportunity for all persons with special regard to groups disadvantaged or oppressed on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, color, class, gender, sexual orientation, age, marital status, political belief, religion and mental or physical disability.

4.02 Collaboration and Networking

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer stall shall work in collaboration with other groups and organizations to further the mission of eliminating domestic and sexual violence.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall have a working knowledge of related systems that impact victims/survivors of crime, specifically domestic and sexual violence.

  1. ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES AS PROFESSIONALS

5.01 Competence

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall accept responsibility or employment only on the basis of existing competence or the intention to acquire the necessary competence.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall strive to become and remain proficient in professional practice and the performance of professional functions.  CCWRC program staff shall critically examine and keep current with emerging knowledge relevant to victim services.  CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall routinely review professional literature and participate in continuing education relevant to CCWRC  practice and ethics. (EP&P Sec.II. D. 5)

(c) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall base practice on recognized knowledge, including that which is empirically based.

5.02 Impairment

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not allow their personal problems, psychosocial distress, legal problems, substance abuse, or mental health difficulties to interfere with their professional judgment and performance or to jeopardize the best interest of people for whom they have a professional responsibility.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff whose personal problems, psychosocial distress, legal problems, substance abuse, or mental health difficulties interfere with their professional judgment and performance shall immediately seek consultation and take appropriate remedial action by seeking professional help, making adjustments in workload, terminate practice, or taking any other steps necessary to protect clients and others.

5.03 Discrimination

CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not practice, condone, facilitate, or collaborate with any form of discrimination based on, national origin, color, gender, sexual orientation, age, marital status, political belief, religion, or mental or physical disability. (EP&P Sec. I.B. and Attachment  A)

5.04 Private Conduct

 CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not permit their private conduct to interfere with their ability to fulfill their professional responsibilities.

5.05 Dishonesty, Fraud and Deception (EP&P Sec. III. D.2)

CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not participate in, condone or be associated with, dishonesty, fraud, deception, or any type of criminal behavior.

5.06 Misrepresentation

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall make clear distinctions between statements made and action engaged in as a private individual and as a representative of the CCWRC, a professional organization, or the CCWRC paid and volunteer staff’s employing agency.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff who speak on behalf of profession victim services agencies shall accurately represent the official authorized positions of the organizations.

(c) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall ensure that their representations to clients, agencies and the public of professional qualifications, credentials, education, competence, affiliations, services provided, or results to be achieved are accurate.  CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall only represent those relevant credentials they actually possess and take steps to correct any inaccuracies or misrepresentations of their credentials by others.

5.07 Solicitations

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not engage in uninvited solicitations of potential clients who, because of their circumstances, are vulnerable to undue influence, manipulation, or coercion.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall not engage in solicitation of testimonial endorsements (including solicitation of consent to use a client’s prior statement as a testimonial endorsement) from current clients or from other people who because of their particular circumstances are vulnerable to undue influence.

5.08 Acknowledging Credit

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall take responsibility and credit, including authorship credit, only for work they have actually performed and to which they have contributed.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall honestly acknowledge the work of and contributions made by others.

  1. ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITY TO THE PROFESSION

6.01 Integrity of the Profession

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall work toward the maintenance and promotion of high standards of practice.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall uphold and advance the values, ethics, knowledge, and mission of the profession.  CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall protect, enhance, and improve the integrity of the profession through appropriate study and research, active discourse and responsible criticism of the profession.

(c) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall contribute time and professional expertise to activities that promote respect for the value, integrity, and competence of the victim services profession.  These activities may include teaching, research, consultation, service, legislation, testimony, presentations in the community, and participation in professional organizations.

(d) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall contribute to the knowledge base of victim services and share with colleagues their knowledge, relevant practice, research and ethics.  CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall seek to contribute to the professional literature and to share their knowledge at professional meetings and conferences.

(e) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall act to prevent the unauthorized and unqualified practice of victim services.

6.02 Evaluation and Research

(a) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall monitor and evaluate policies, implementation of programs and practice interventions.

(b) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall promote and facilitate evaluation and research to contribute to the development of knowledge.

(c) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall critically examine and keep current with emerging knowledge relevant to victim services and fully use evaluation and research evidence in their professional practice. (EP& P Sec.II. D.5. and Sec. VI. J.3)

(d) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff engaged in evaluation and research shall carefully consider possible consequences and shall follow guidelines developed for the protection of evaluation and research participants.  Appropriate institutional review boards shall be consulted.

(e) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff engaged in the evaluation of services shall discuss collected information only for professional purposes and only with professionals concerned with this information.

(f) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall take appropriate steps to ensure that participants in evaluation and research have access to appropriate supportive services.

(g) CCWRC paid and volunteer staff shall report evaluation and research findings accurately.  They shall not fabricate or falsify results and take steps to correct any errors later found in published data using standard publication methods.

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Communications Policy

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors DATE

  1. Overview

The Centre County Women’s Resource Center’s (CCWRC) Communications Policy applies to all incoming and outgoing communications of the CCWRC.  All employees and volunteers of the CCWRC are covered under this policy and shall adhere to its rules and regulations.

The goals of this policy are to outline appropriate and inappropriate use of CCWRC’s communication and Internet resources, including the use of browsers, electronic mail and instant messaging, file uploads and downloads, and voice and paper communications.

The telephones, voice mail, fax, electronic mail (e-mail), CCWRC letterhead, and all mail incoming and outgoing are the property of the CCWRC.  Therefore, any use of CCWRC property and any electronic, or other, communications sent or received, and use of the internet may be accessed and monitored by persons authorized by CCWRC.

The Communications Policy establishes clear guidelines for the use of computers, phones, the internet, mail and correspondence, and access to the CCWRC’s security system.

  1. Computer/Information Access

All computers are accessed by individual passwords.  These passwords must be changed on a periodic basis as established by the IT Manager.  Once the computers are accessed, another individual password is needed for the certain other programs such as accounting and client record programs.  These passwords will be changed when an employee vacates one of these positions.

IT resources include, but are not limited to, all communications, hardware, software, content, procedures, and related information, materials and services owned, operated, stored or transported by or on behalf of the CCWRC, whether networked or standalone, shared or individually controlled, including items not owned by the CCWRC but intentionally connected to CCWRC resources.

  1. General Technology Policy

CCWRC has developed, and will continue to develop its technology for business needs. CCWRC furnishes technology to employees so that they can best complete their job and business related activities. To ensure compliance with the technology policy, all types of technology use may be monitored at the discretion of the Executive Director.  If improper use of technology is discovered, disciplinary measures may be taken. CCWRC employees are not permitted to download unauthorized software to any computer workstation. Employees shall report all technology needs to their immediate supervisor who forwards the information to the Director of Administration/CFO.

CCWRC property is to be used only for conducting agency business.

Technology may not be used for private commercial ventures, religious or political causes, outside organizations or other non-job related solicitations. No disruptive or offensive materials may be created, viewed or transmitted when using CCWRC technology. Offensive materials may include, but are not limited to pornography, racial slurs, or any comments which negatively address one’s gender, age, sexual orientation, religious or political beliefs, national origin, or disability. When using technology, employees will uphold the CCWRC’s mission and other policies.

Confidentiality

Employees will use technology in accordance with the CCWRC Confidentiality Policy agreed to by all employees. Thus, employees may not use a password, access a file, or retrieve any stored information without authorization. Some employees will be given individual passwords to access their files. However, employees should remember that all information is still CCWRC property and may be viewed as necessary. For security purposes, individual passwords must not be shared with any internal personnel or external sources. In addition, when employees step away from their desk, they must be certain that no confidential information is displayed on their computer monitor, and that no confidential printed materials are visible on the desk. When printing or faxing confidential information, employees will take care to promptly remove the materials from the printer or fax machine.

Email

CCWRC recognizes that email is an insecure and highly impermanent form of correspondence. All email sent from or saved on the CCWRC network is property of the CCWRC. Employees will keep this in mind and use email primarily for business purposes. It is understood that incidental and occasional personal use may occur. This may happen when sending/receiving a personal message creates no direct cost for the agency. For example, it is acceptable to view personal email during one’s lunch break. It is unacceptable to use personal email during paid work time or to print personal email. No email attachments of a non-business nature are to be sent or downloaded when using CCWRC property. Non-business attachments are prohibited due to the risk of computer viruses which could affect individual computers and the entire agency network.

Email does not ensure secure confidential communication with CCWRC clients. If a client prefers this method of communication, employees must clearly explain this limitation to their client.

Since CCWRC uses its agency email to communicate to employees, employees are responsible for checking their email regularly, and responding to messages promptly and professionally. Email should be checked and responded to as any message from office or cellular phones.

Internet Use

Internet access is provided by CCWRC to assist employees in performing their job functions and duties. Internet use is thus limited to necessary business activities. Occasional and limited personal use is permitted, as long as it creates no direct cost to the agency. As with personal email, printing of personal Internet searches/pages/etc. may not be done. If personal use of the Internet is found to interfere with job function or productivity, or presents the agency with direct costs, disciplinary measures may be taken. Internet sites visited while using CCWRC property must not contain materials which conflict with CCWRC mission or any other policies. When using the internet, employees shall not download unauthorized software, as doing so increases the risk of computer viruses which could affect individual computers and the entire agency network.

  1. Phone, Voicemail, Cellular Phone and Mail Policy

Office Phones

Personal use of the telephone for long-distance and toll calls is not permitted. Employees should practice discretion when making local personal calls and may be required to reimburse CCWRC for any charges resulting from their personal use of the telephone. The use of agency phones and agency time for personal, local calls should be brief, limited, and not overused.

To ensure effective telephone communications, employees should always use a professional greeting and speak in a courteous and professional manner. If employees are assisting at the front desk reception area, they must use front desk protocols for answering phone lines.

Cellular Phones

Employees may have access to a cell phone while in their cars and should remember that their primary responsibility is driving safely and obeying the rules of the road. Employees are prohibited from texting or using cellular phones to conduct business while driving and should safely pull off the road and come to a complete stop before dialing, talking on the phone, texting or emailing.

As a CCWRC representative, cell phone users are reminded that the regular business etiquette employed when speaking from office phones or in meetings applies to conversations conducted over a cell phone. In addition, cell phone users are reminded that conversations held on cell phones do not ensure secure confidential communication.

If a staff member accesses their CCWRC e-mail through their cellular phone, the phone must be set up with a passcode.

Voicemail

Voicemail is provided to employees to allow for enhanced communication. Clients, professionals, and others who call staff will be directed to the staff member’s voicemail when he/she is unavailable. Staff members must check their voicemail regularly and respond to messages in a prompt manner. When employees are out of the office, or unable to respond to voicemail for two days or longer, their voicemail recording must be changed to reflect this.

Mail System

The use of CCWRC -paid postage for personal correspondence is not permitted.

  1. Computer Virus Policy

It is extremely important that a virus does not enter the CCWRC computer system. Most computer viruses will quickly spread through computer systems and communications links. If your computer system becomes infected, all programs and data files, including those stored on backup tapes, would be at extreme risk for damage or loss. Therefore, you must take definitive steps to prevent such infections from occurring. Every employee must play an active role in this prevention process.

We ask that you adhere to the following guidelines when working with your computer systems:

An Administration team member of the CCWRC must approve all software before it is loaded on any CCWRC computer. The system is protected so that an administrative password must be entered before downloading any software.  Only Administration team members have access to this password.

Hard drives of user workstations must be virus checked weekly using virus detection software that is installed on each computer. The virus detection software will be scheduled to automatically run on each individual computer.

Any unusual computer activity, such as abnormal screen displays/messages, system lockups, severe slowdowns, or lost files, should be reported to the Administration Team as soon as possible. If there is a suspicion that a virus exists, a virus detection program will be run.

CCWRC staff using USB drives externally must run a virus scan on the USB prior to opening any files on their CCWRC computer.

  1. Social Media Policies

CCWRC recognizes the vital importance of participating in and developing online communities to support the prevention of dating and domestic violence, sexual violence, and stalking and to support people who are affected by these issues. These Social Media Policies and Procedures have been developed to help empower staff to use social media to communicate, collaborate, educate and represent CCWRC and the spirit of our projects. (For Social Media Procedures please see separate procedures document)

CCWRC is committed to using social media tools in a professional manner that is consistent with our organizational values and policies. These policies and procedures will be reviewed and updated annually to ensure their relevance as new technologies and social media tools emerge.

GoalsThe goal of CCWRC’s social media engagement is to: (1) provide a leadership voice on current issues related to intervention in and prevention of dating and domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking; (2) shift public thinking about dating and domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking; (3) support the strategic use of social media by local, state, national and international programs by building online communities; and (4) spread awareness of CCWRC services so that potential clients know how to seek help.

ValuesOur work via social media, as well as offline, is guided by specific core values.  CCWRC encourages all staff to explore and engage in social media communications at a level at which they feel comfortable. Approach activities online as you would any other work activities. The principles of CCWRC’s vision, mission, and founding philosophy should be the basis for all of the organization’s activities on social media. Additionally, it is critical that all agency representatives demonstrate the following core values in all our work:

  • History: We remember, honor, share, retell and are guided by the richness of our history- we build on it and use it. The future we create is informed- but not dictated- by our history.
  • Social Transformation: We do transformative work of social change, with a commitment to intentional collaboration, for the collective good.
  • Right to Services: We believe all people have the right to services.
  • Ethics, Integrity and Trust: We work together to merit the trust of our colleagues and those we serve. We strive to be equitable, ethical and professional, and to behave in ways that are non-judgmental, with honor, respect and dignity.
  • Stewardship of Resources: We are responsible stewards of resources. We are dedicated to the efficient and effective use of our resources.  We accept the responsibility of the public’s trust and are accountable for our actions.
  • Diversity: We appreciate and honor diversity. We foster an environment that promotes and supports the valuing of all people. Social media content should represent and appeal to the vast variety of potential followers to reflect the CCWRC’s desire for inclusive services.
  • Accountability to Victims: Our work is victim-centered. We include, honor and empower survivors, and acknowledge that their experiences serve as a valuable resource and important voice in framing, informing and affirming our work.

Confidentiality and Supporting Survivors

The existing confidentiality policy of the CCWRC shall apply to all electronic communications, including social media.  Every effort shall be made to protect confidential communications as defined in said policy.  However, the nature of social media presents additional concerns surrounding confidentiality, which are addressed in more detail in the Social Media Procedures document.

For Additional information on Social Media please see the Social Media Procedures Document.

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Confidentiality Policy

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors DATE

I. STATEMENT OF CONFIDENTIALITY

It is the policy of the Centre County Women’s Resource Center (CCWRC) to hold confidential all communications, observations and information made by, between, or about service recipients.

Confidentiality is defined as the assurance that access to information regarding a service recipient shall be strictly controlled. Communications are confidential whether made by adults or children, and whether to or between paid or un-paid staff, volunteers, safe home providers, student interns or board members of this organization who have met Pennsylvania’s statutory requirements for confidentiality.

Confidential communications are accorded to any person identifying himself or herself as a victim of domestic or dating violence, sexual assault or stalking who seeks services from the CCWRC, including any service recipient, child or non-abusive significant other who seeks the CCWRC’s assistance.

II. DEFINITIONS

Confidential Communications
All information, whether written or spoken, transmitted between a victim and a domestic violence/sexual assault counselor/advocate in the course of the relationship, including the fact that the service recipient has had contact with the CCWRC is considered confidential communication. The term includes information received or given by the domestic violence/sexual assault counselor/advocate in the course of the relationship, as well as advice, reports, statistical data, memoranda or working papers, records or the like, given or made in the course of the relationship. The term also includes communications made by or to a linguistic interpreter assisting the victim, counselor or advocate in the course of the relationship.  Confidential communication between service recipients and domestic violence/sexual assault counselor/advocates shall be governed by statute and case law, specifically 23 Pa.C.S. §6102 and 42 PA. CSA Sec. 5945.1.

Confidentiality
A domestic violence counselor/ advocate or a co-participant who is present during domestic violence counseling/advocacy shall not be competent nor permitted to testify or to otherwise disclose confidential communications made to or by the counselor/advocate by or to a victim. Neither the domestic violence counselor/ advocate nor the victim shall waive the privilege    of confidential communications by reporting facts of physical or sexual assault under Chapter 63 (relating to child protective services), a Federal or State mandatory reporting statute or a local mandatory reporting ordinance (23 Pa.C.S. §6116).

Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Counselor/Advocate
The CCWRC is a dual service agency providing services to victims of domestic and dating violence, sexual assault and stalking.  Paid and un-paid staff considered to be covered by the confidentiality statute have met the following criteria:

  • Are engaged in a domestic violence/sexual assault program, the primary purpose of which is the rendering of counseling or assistance to victims of domestic and dating violence, sexual assault and/or stalking;
  • Have undergone a minimum of 72 hours of training on domestic and dating violence, sexual assault and stalking;
  • Are under the supervision of a Direct Services Supervisor who has completed a minimum of 72 hours of training and whose responsibilities include case management and supervision.

Victim
For purposes of 23 Pa.C.S. §6116 (relating to confidentiality), a victim is a person against whom abuse is committed who consults a domestic violence/sexual assault counselor or advocate for the purpose of securing advice, counseling or assistance. The term shall also include persons who have a significant relationship with the victim and who seek advice, counseling or assistance from a domestic violence/sexual assault counselor or advocate regarding abuse of the victim (23 Pa.C.S. §6102).

III. SECURING CONFIDENTIALITY

All information that is acquired in the course of the relationship of a service recipient and a domestic violence/sexual assault program shall be considered confidential and protected as an evidentiary privilege, except the information that must be disclosed as a result of Pennsylvania’s mandatory child abuse reporting requirements.

All service recipients, whether they are receiving services in person, by electronic communication or on the telephone, will be informed of the limitations and extent of our confidentiality and the nature of our services.

All service recipients, staff, volunteers, safe home providers, other relevant parties, including those who have a significant relationship with the service recipient, board members and student interns must sign a written agreement to maintain confidentiality. Violation of this policy may be grounds for terminating services or the relationship with the CCWRC. Human service professionals will, likewise, be required to protect our communications with them.

All persons, during the time they are associated with the CCWRC as an employee, volunteer or service recipient, are prohibited from disclosing confidential communications. This prohibition against disclosure continues even after that person’s association with the CCWRC ends. After leaving the CCWRC, staff, volunteers and service recipients continue to be prohibited from disclosing confidential communications.

IV. SERVICE RECIPIENT FILES

The CCWRC maintains records of service recipient contact for statistical and service–related information purposes only. For this reason, it is the policy of the CCWRC to include only minimal information in service recipient files to satisfy reporting requirements.

Each service recipient shall be informed that the CCWRC maintains service recipient files. Requests by service recipients to review their files are honored.

Access to service recipient records, both open and closed files, is permissible only to persons who meet all statutory requirements for asserting the domestic violence/sexual assault privilege, including a minimum of 72 hours of training. The executive director shall control and monitor access to all service recipient and administrative files.

Requests by any third party, including but not limited to a service recipient’s attorney, will not be honored without a service recipient’s prior informed, written consent to release information. The CCWRC may require a forty-eight hour notice for purposes of making the file available. A review of the file must be done in the presence of the executive director or his/her designee.

In all cases where access is requested by other than authorized persons including, but not limited to, funding sources and licensing authorities:

a. Service recipient identity, which includes numeric identifiers that may include portions of the service recipient’s name, birth date, social security number or gender, must always be protected.
b. The person requesting access to the files must sign a confidentiality statement.
Information received from other sources may not be reviewed or copied. The service recipient will be referred to the original source for copies of those materials.

The service recipient, or an authorized third party, may make notes about the contents of the file and may make a written request for a copy of those portions of the file that have not been created by the CCWRC or by an outside source. The service recipient may be required to pay the costs of photocopying.

The service recipient may request in writing to the executive director the correction or removal of inaccurate, irrelevant, out-dated or incomplete information from his/her file. The executive director shall consider any such request and the file may be corrected to make it accurate. If the CCWRC and the service recipient dispute the accuracy of a proposed correction, the dispute shall be noted and the file shall remain unchanged. Any document or notation required by the DPW contract must remain in the file.

Service recipient files may not be removed from the agency except with the prior written permission of the executive director or his/her designee.

The CCWRC reserves the right to deny access to any file related to litigation by the service recipient or the service recipient’s agent against the CCWRC.

V. RELEASE OF INFORMATION

General Statement:  Release of any information to a third party must be purposeful, clear, voluntary and with prior informed consent. Lawful consents to release service recipient information may only occur when the service recipient signs a consent form prior to disclosure. Verbal consent of the service recipient to release information does not provide the statutory protection required.

The executive director may determine that disclosure of any information subject to confidential communications shall not be made even though a service recipient executes a written consent to release information. Where the executive director concludes that the requested release of information could endanger the service recipient, the CCWRC, other service recipients, staff, student interns, volunteers or board members, the executive director is not bound by the written consent to release information.

Disclosure to Another Center:  It is the policy of the CCWRC that the service recipient holds the privilege and except for limited circumstances, the service recipient is the sole decision maker as to whether information about his/her life should and will be disclosed to a third party. Accordingly, CCWRC staff may not disclose information about a service recipient to another Center without the service recipient’s prior written consent to release information. This restriction includes communication that may be requested to effectuate transfer of a service recipient from the CCWRC to another Center. Any disclosure without prior written consent will be treated by the CCWRC as a breach.

Death of Service Recipient:  It is the general policy of the CCWRC that disclosures after death of the service recipient shall still be resisted.

General Exceptions:  There may be circumstances under which the CCWRC may disclose confidential information without the consent of a service recipient. Those narrow circumstances under which disclosure without the prior consent of the service recipient may be made include a court-ordered declaration of incompetence of the service recipient, medical emergencies, and mandatory child abuse reporting. The executive director or his/her designee alone has the authority to make a decision regarding intentional disclosures without written consent of a service recipient.

Assessing the Risk of Harm/Intentional Breach: If the CCWRC believes a service recipient is likely to engage in an act of serious violence against an identifiable person or the service recipient is likely to commit serious harm to himself or herself, there may be limited circumstances under which the executive director makes a choice to breach confidentiality in order to prevent the harm from occurring. Under these circumstances, the executive director shall carefully consider the concerns for safety and confidentiality of the service recipient as well as for the staff, volunteers, interns, board members, and safe home providers, and exercise his/her discretion accordingly.

VI. RESPONDING TO BREACH OF CONFIDENTIALITY

A breach of confidentiality is a failure to maintain confidentiality of service recipient information where disclosure is not an authorized exception under the law, as enumerated in Section IV above. Any breach of confidentiality shall be immediately addressed and every effort shall be made to protect the service recipient from further harm by protecting his/her privacy from further intrusion and by renewing his/her safety planning efforts.

In the event of a breach, the executive director shall direct that all appropriate actions be taken to protect the service recipient and his/her information from further disclosure. If staff breaches confidentiality, that person who compromised confidentiality may be removed from the advocacy and service plan for the service recipient who is the subject of the breach at the discretion of the executive director.

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SUBJECT: Conflict of Interest

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors DATE

POLICY: The Centre County Women’s Resource Center (CCWRC) is mandated to have broad public service interests and not to serve the parochial interests of the staff, volunteers or board. All members of the organization are expected to conduct themselves in a manner so as to best serve the interests and needs o f the CCWRC.

With this in mind, all paid and volunteer staff members, including board members are expected to avoid potential conflict of interest situations and to report immediately should she/he find her/himself in such a position.

PROCEDURE

1. Members of the CCWRC are expected to refrain from entering into contracts, transactions or activity which might or appear to affect the CCWRC staff, volunteer or board member’s judgment or decision exercised on behalf of the Women’s Resource Center. Such transactions must also be avoided as they might cause criticism of the CCWRC from a group or governmental agency.

2. Those acting on behalf of the CCWRC will not permit anyone or any group to use the Center’s facility, equipment, mailing lists, computer data or employee time for private gain or advantage.

3. Former staff members may be recruited to serve on the Board of Directors after they have been absent from the position for at least one year. As with all board positions, the addition of this person to the board will occur only after the board nomination committee presents the name of the person as a suggestion for approval of the full board and then the membership.

4. Former board members may apply for employment with the CCWRC. If a Board member resigns a position with the board to apply for employment with the CCWRC, she/he may not be reinstated to the board until the next board term.

5. A board member may provide volunteer services to the Women’s Resource Center outside her/his position as a board member. For example, if board member is a trained counselor advocate, she/he may provide hotline coverage, facilitate a support group or do educational programs on behalf of the Center.

6. Former service recipients may serve on the board, however, they must not have been in receipt of services for at least six months.

7. All honoraria’s given to persons acting on behalf of the CCWRC, will be submitted to the Women’s Resource Center.

8. No persons acting on behalf of the Women’s Resource Center may accept gifts or services for their performance of duties on behalf of the organization.

9. Any materials developed by a volunteer or staff member on behalf of the CCWRC are to be considered property of the Center.

10. Any matters perceived to be or to possibly create a conflict of interest will be resolved by the Board of Directors. The Board of Directors will vote to validate or invalidate transactions between the Center and associated persons and/or firms.

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Drug and Alcohol Policy

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors DATE

1.  Policy

It is the policy of the Centre County Women’s Resource Center (hereinafter “CCWRC”) to provide a workplace that is free from the use, sale, possession, or distribution of illegal drugs, and free from the improper use of legal drugs and alcohol.  All paid and volunteer staff must be free from the effects of illegal drugs, abuse of legal drugs, and alcohol while at work, whether on or off CCWRC’s premises.

CCWRC recognizes that a successful approach to the problems of alcohol and drugs requires education, counseling, assistance, deterrents, and discipline in a consistent and compassionate manner.  If a paid or volunteer staff member wishes help for any drug or alcohol problem, s/he should contact her/his supervisor.  All requests for assistance will be kept confidential.  However, CCWRC does reserve the right to utilize every reasonable measure to ensure the safety of workers, clients, volunteers, and other individuals.

2. Definitions

Illegal Drugs:  Any narcotics, hallucinogens, depressants, stimulants, or other substances capable of creating or maintaining adverse effects on an individual’s physical, emotional, or mental condition, unless (1) prescribed for current medical treatment by a licensed health professional where the individual does not intentionally exceed prescribed dosages, and (2) an over-the-counter medicine used for treatment of health problems where the package instructions are not intentionally violated.

Under the influence of:  An individual is under the influence of drugs or alcohol if, at any time while at work, on or off CCWRC’s premises, or on CCWRC property during non-work hours, the individual’s mental or physical functions are impaired by the use of illegal drugs, abuse of legal drugs, or use of alcohol.

3. Rules of Conduct

Violation of this policy subjects an employee or volunteer to disciplinary action, up to and including discharge from employment.  Prohibited acts include:

A. The use, possession, sale, attempt to sell, manufacture, purchase, attempt to purchase, or transfer of illegal drugs or alcohol while (1) on the job, or (2) on CCWRC premises. CCWRC also reserves the right to impose discipline, up to and including discharge, for convictions resulting from the sale, attempt to sell, possession, use, or transfer of illegal drugs, regardless of whether the employee was on or off CCWRC property, and regardless of whether the illegal acts occurred during work time or outside of work time.

B. Being under the influence of drugs or alcohol while at work or on CCWRC property.

4. Drug-Free Workplace Act

The Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 requires that an employee notify the Executive  Director if s/he is convicted of or pleads “no contest” to illegally manufacturing, selling, distributing, possessing, or using illegal drugs while employed by the CCWRC.  Such notification must occur within five days of the employee’s conviction or pleading “no contest.”  The Act also requires the CCWRC to report any criminal conviction of one of its employees involving illegal drug activity while at work to the appropriate government contracting agency within ten days and to take “appropriate” action against the employee within 30 days.

5. Paid and Volunteer Staff Statement

All paid and volunteer staff members are required to sign a statement indicating their acknowledgement of and agreement with the terms of the CCWRC’s Drug and Alcohol Policy.

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Equal Employment Opportunity 

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Guidelines Regarding Work Attire

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors DATE

Each staff person’s dress should be appropriate to the work place and the functions being performed.  This includes volunteer, part-time and full-time staff.

Because it is important for staff to be easily identified by residents, clients and others, all staff are to wear a CCWRC nametag whenever at work at the CCWRC.

Staff are expected to present a professional image to residents, clients, representatives from systems and the general public.  Business casual wear, including jeans and dress shorts, is acceptable in most circumstances.  There may be times when casual attire is not appropriate, such as some systems meetings.  Staff should check with their supervisors if they have a question about appropriateness of wear.  Casual shoes, sneakers, and sandals are suitable for the work environment.

Some possible examples of unacceptable attire:

  • jeans with holes, rips, and/or frayed edges
  • tee shirts with slogans and/or large logos other than CCWRC (small logos such as a polo player or swoosh are fine)
  •  athletic wear, workout clothing and sweatpants (depending on your job responsibilities)
  • revealing clothing (tight or low-cut, for example)
  • very casual or short shorts
  • ball caps
  • rubber (shower) flip-flops.

The various Center teams and projects have different functions and will, at times, have different standards for dress.  For example, the advocates attending a court hearing will need to modify their dress in a different way than one who is meeting with a client or cleaning out a transitional housing unit.

Team directors are responsible for informing their staff about specific requirements for functions outside the Center, including situations where clothing and/or body art (tattoos and piercings) may be restricted.

Sensitivity to differences in cultural expressions will inform discussions around dress.

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Harassment Policy

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors DATE

It is the policy of the CCWRC that all employees are entitled to an environment that is free from harassment based on race, religion, sex, age, disability, national origin, sexual orientation or for any other reason prohibited by law.  Any employee who violates this policy is subject to disciplinary action up to and including dismissal.

Definitions:

Prohibited harassment is verbal or physical conduct (including actions such as insulting or offensive comments, jokes, pictures, etc.) relating to an individual’s race, religion, sex, age, color, disability, national origin or sexual orientation, when the conduct is severe or pervasive and:  (1) has the purpose or effect of creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive working environment; or (2) has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s performance.

Sexual harassment can include unwanted or unwelcome attention or action of a sexual nature, or other conduct directed at another person on the basis of their sex, for example, physical contact, sexual remarks or jokes, sexual advances or displaying materials of a sexual nature.  Conduct of this kind constitutes prohibited sexual harassment under the circumstances described above and also when (1) submission to the conduct is either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of employment status or (2) submission to or rejection of the conduct is used as a basis for decisions affecting an individual’s employment status.

Complaint Procedures:

  1. Whenever an employee believes she/he has been subjected to prohibited harassment by another employee or by anyone else with whom she/he comes into contact through work, the employee should report the incident in a timely manner to the Executive Director or to her/his immediate supervisor.
  1. Employees who make a complaint of prohibited harassment in good faith or provide information related to such complaints are protected against retaliation or reprisal of any kind.  Any employee who takes negative action against another employee because of his/her involvement in a harassment complaint is subject to disciplinary action, up to and including discharge.
  1. Employees are encouraged to report harassment concerns before the behavior in question becomes severe or pervasive.
  1. CCWRC will respond to harassment complaints as quickly as possible.  We will make every reasonable effort to resolve these matters fairly and in the most confidential manner possible.
  1. Investigation of complaints may include discussions with the parties who are directly involved and with other individuals who may have knowledge relating to the complaint.  The investigation will be conducted with regard for the privacy and rights of all concerned.
  1. If the CCWRC’s findings substantiate a harassment complaint, the action necessary to address the problem will be determined and implemented by the Executive Director, in consultation with the Personnel Committee.  If the complaint involves the Executive Director, the investigation and decisions related to sanctions will be handled by the Board members on the Personnel Committee.  Sanctions against an offender will depend on the specific facts and circumstances, and may range from a reprimand up to and including immediate discharge.

Any questions or concerns relating the CCWRC’s anti-harassment policy should be discussed with a Team Director or the Executive Director.

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Inclement Weather/Closing Policy

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors DATE

In case of a severe weather emergency, such as a snowstorm, it may be necessary to adjust normal work schedules.  The Center will make decisions on closings and openings on the basis of the best information available and will respond to potential hazardous weather conditions that affect all of our employees.

Closing decisions

  1. Decisions to close or delay opening will be made by 6:55AM by Senior Staff.
  2. Senior staff will notify directors by 7AM. Directors will notify their team members.
  3. The Prothonotary’s office will be notified when we are closed.

In case of a closing, delayed opening, or early closing:

Employees in essential services, as determined by the supervisor

  1. Essential services will be covered in the following way:
    1. Shelter will be covered by one part-time or one full-time staff.
    2. Hotline will be covered by two staff or volunteers.
    3. SART responses at the hospital and University will not be considered essential services. Volunteers will not be required to go to SART’s in inclement weather.
    4. Courthouse/PFA coverage will be provided IF there is an advocate who resides in Bellefonte, is available, and is able to safely access the Courthouse. Otherwise we will rely on the pro se system for PFA applications.
  2. Employees who are required to work as part of essential service provision during that employee’s regular shift shall be granted equivalent time off only for the hours worked during the official closedown period. Hours worked before and/or after the close down do not qualify for equivalent time off.
  3. Equivalent time off shall be scheduled at another time mutually agreeable to the employee and the supervisor
  4. Overtime will be paid to full time employees if they are not able to take equivalent time off (for example, at the end of a pay period), as determined by their supervisor.
  5. Part time shelter staff will be paid the differential rate when working hours during a closedown.

Employees in other than essential services, as determined by the supervisor

  1. An employee shall receive pay for the part of the work schedule missed during the official closedown.
  2. An employee who had requested to use vacation, personal holiday, or sick leave time shall not have such time charged for the period of the employee’s regular work time encompassed by an official closedown.

Note:  If it is determined that the office will be open, but a staff member feels it is not safe to travel from their location, they can discuss the use of vacation or personal time with their supervisor.

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Non-Discrimination Policy

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors DATE

  1. The Centre County Women’s Resource Center (CCWRC) agrees as follows:

A. The CCWRC shall not discriminate against any client, employee, applicant for employment, independent contractor, or any other person because of race, color, religious creed, ancestry, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, or sex, except where being a female is a bonafide occupational qualification.

The CCWRC shall take affirmative action to determine that employees, agents, and or clients are treated during employment or during the receipt of domestic violence and/or sexual assault services, without regard to their race, color, religious creed, ancestry, national origin, age, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, or sex, except where being a female is a bonafide occupational qualification.  Such affirmative action shall include, but is not limited to, the following: employment, hiring, upgrading, demotion, or transfer; recruitment or recruitment advertising; layoff or termination; rates of pay or other forms of compensation; selection for training; determination of eligibility for domestic violence and/or sexual assault services; and provision of domestic violence and/or sexual assault services.

The CCWRC will post in a conspicuous place, available to employees, agents, applicants for employment, clients, and other persons, a notice to be provided by the contracting agency setting forth the provisions of this non-discrimination clause.

B. The CCWRC shall in advertisements or requests for employment placed by it on its behalf state that it is an equal opportunity employer.

C. The CCWRC shall comply with the Contract Compliance Regulations of the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commissions, 16 PA Code Chapter 49 and all laws prohibiting discrimination in hiring or employment opportunities. In the event of the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape and/or the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence’s non-compliance with the non-discrimination clause of this contract or with any such laws, this contract may, after full hearing and adjudication, be terminated or suspended, in whole or in part, and the CCWRC may be declared temporarily ineligible for further Commonwealth contracts, and such other sanctions may be imposed and remedies invoked as provided by the Contract Compliance Regulations.

D. The CCWRC shall furnish all necessary employment documents and records to, and permit access to its books, records, and accounts by the contracting agency and the Human Relations Commission, for purposes of investigation to ascertain compliance with the provisions of the contract Compliance Regulations, pursuant to 49.35 of these Regulations. If the CCWRC does not possess documents or records reflecting the necessary information requested, it shall furnish such information on reporting forms supplied by the contracting agency or the Commission.

E. The CCWRC shall actively recruit minority subcontractors or subcontractors with substantial minority representation among their employees, as best as possible.

F. The CCWRC shall include the provisions on this non-discrimination clause in every subcontract, so that such provisions will be binding upon such subcontractors.

G. The terms used in this non-discrimination clause shall have the same meaning as in the Contract Compliance Regulations issued by the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission, 16 PA Code Ch. 49.

H. The CCWRC’s obligations under this clause are limited to their facilities within Pennsylvania, or where the contract is for purchase of goods manufactured outside of Pennsylvania, the facilities at which such goods are actually produced.

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Religious Accommodation Policy

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors 1/17/17

POLICY:

CCWRC is committed to providing a work environment that is respectful of the religious beliefs of all its employees. Consistent with this commitment, CCWRC will make good faith efforts to provide a reasonable religious accommodation to employees, volunteers, and unpaid interns whose sincerely held religious beliefs conflict with an employment requirement, unless such an accommodation would create an undue hardship for the organization.

Reasonable Religious Accommodation

A reasonable accommodation in the workplace allows an employee/volunteer to observe a sincerely held religious practice or belief, as long as it does not create undue hardship for the organization. CCWRC will provide reasonable accommodations to employees to observe a sincerely held religious belief under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and/or the Pennsylvania Human Relations Act (PHRA), provided CCWRC has notice of their need for religious accommodations.  Requested accommodations must be consistent with the CCWRC Mission and the Non-Discrimination Policy.

Retaliation is Prohibited

CCWRC prohibits retaliation against employees who request a religious accommodation or who participate in an approved accommodation. An employee who violates this anti-retaliation provision may be subject to discipline, up to and including termination.

PROCEDURES:

Requesting a Religious Accommodation

If you feel you need an accommodation for a sincerely held religious belief, then you will need to notify your immediate supervisor in writing. The request should include the following information:

  • A description of the requested accommodation
  • The reason for the requested accommodation

Determinations of Accommodation Requests

CCWRC makes determinations concerning religious accommodation requests on a case-by- case basis, and relies on fact-specific inquiries to determine if it will provide a reasonable accommodation. Your supervisor will notify you of CCWRC’s determination of your request.

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Religious Non-Affiliation

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors DATE

POLICY:        To insure that all clients receive services that are not based in one particular religious or spiritual belief, the Center County Women’s Resource Center, CCWRC, will not advance any religious doctrine, practice or affiliation.

PROCEDURE:

  1. The CCWRC will attempt to develop and maintain relationships with all religious and spiritual groups in the community for the purpose of referrals, public education, training, financial and in-kind support. However, if any such relationship jeopardizes or compromises the CCWRC’s ability to maintain independence, the relationship will be minimized or terminated.
  1. Individual counselors, whether paid or volunteer, with the CCWRC must not be influenced by their individual religious beliefs or practices when providing support services to CCWRC clients.
  1. The CCWRC will make every effort to find an appropriate referral for clients who express a need for some type of religious or spiritual counseling or support.

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Recruitment, Hiring, and Promotion Policy

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors 1/17/17

A.  All recruitment, selection and promotion of CCWRC will occur within the framework of the CCWRC Affirmative Action Policy and the CCWRC Non-Discrimination Policy.

B.  Recruitment

  1. The Executive Director has primary responsibility for recruitment. The primary responsibility for recruitment of a new Executive Director lies with the Chair of the Board.
  1. Recruitment (except in the case of the Executive Director) shall normally be made internally through postings at the CCWRC and job announcements emailed to all CCWRC volunteers and staff. External recruitment shall be made through the use of advertisements in local media outlets and job-posting websites. Internal and external recruitment shall occur simultaneously.
  1. Announcements shall include a statement that the CCWRC is an equal opportunity employer and an affirmative action employer.
  1. Former Board members of the CCWRC may apply for positions; however, current Board members are ineligible for employment.
  1. All applicants (both internal and external) must submit a letter, résumé, and list of references by the stated deadline or until the position has been filled. Depending on the position, additional information and/or materials may be requested as a part of the application process.

C.  Selection

  1. The Hiring Committee shall consist of the Executive Director or their designee and the Director of the team in which the position resides. If the position to be filled is a Team or Project Director, the Hiring Committee shall include the Executive Director, the Assistant Executive Director and another Director.
  1. The Hiring Committee shall review all applications to determine which applicants shall be interviewed.
  1. The Hiring Committee shall interview the final candidates, check references, and make the final decision. The Hiring Committee shall also consider input from other staff members participating in the interview process.
  1. When the Executive Director’s position is to be filled, the Chair of the Board shall follow the procedures described in the Centre County Women’s Resource Center Executive Director Succession Plan, adopted by the Board of Directors on April 19, 2016. The Board of Directors is responsible for selection and appointment of the Executive Director.  Notification of the appointment of the new Executive Director will go to all funding sources.

D.  Promotion

  1. It is the practice of the CCWRC to advertise internally and externally for staff vacancies within the organization. While staff positions may be reclassified, staff movement between positions, including what might be understood as a promotion, will only occur with the internal and possibly external posting of the position and within the recruitment process outlined above.

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Safe Sanctuary Policy

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors 1/17/17

FOR CCWRC STAFF, INTERNS AND VOLUNTEERS

Scope of Policy

This policy and its provisions shall apply to all persons including all paid and unpaid staff, interns and volunteers who have any contact with children and youth (anyone under the age of 18) who participate in any individual or group counseling, or any other activities/events associated with the CCWRC.

Supervision

When an adult staff member or volunteer works with a child one-on-one in a counseling session, mentoring or play, knowledge and observation by another adult staff member or volunteer is essential. The following are necessary for implementing this:

  • Another staff, intern or volunteer will have prior knowledge of the meeting between the adult and child
  • The child and adult will always be within line of sight of another adult
  • The line of sight may be done by windows, open doors, glass doors, or electronic technology
  • Random and frequent checks during the session will be done by at least one other staff

During children’s support group or other group activities with children the following are suggestions:

  • Understanding that there is safety in numbers, one adult can be in contact with multiple children so long as they are in compliance with the above protocol
  • When possible, there shall be a minimum of two (2) adults per room
  • Again, recognizing that there is safety in numbers, children and youth will be instructed to use the “buddy system” during group work

To achieve compliance with the above policy it may be necessary to combine groups; recruit, train, and reference additional volunteers; or cancel a session or event.

Training

For all persons seeking to work with children at CCWRC or as part of a CCWRC event/activity at a different location, that person (staff, intern and/or volunteer) shall have already participated in the following:

  • The PCAR and PCADV 80 hour training through the CCWRC or another PA equivalent program
  • A thorough orientation to this policy in which a Director of CCWRC has supervised and acknowledged that the staff, intern, or volunteer fully understands
  • Child and criminal abuse clearances, and fingerprints

It is also strongly encouraged that there be at least one adult present who is trained and certified in First Aid and CPR

Screening for Adults

Careful screening is one way to prevent the abuse of children and youth. Screening calls for a gathering and review of information in search of those who can provide safe and caring supervision in a safe environment.

Persons having a criminal history of any of the following types of offenses shall not be allowed to work with children and youth:

  • Child abuse, whether physical, emotional, sexual, or neglectful
  • Violent offenses, including murder, rape, assault, domestic violence, etc.

Reporting of Incidents

  • Immediate reporting to Childline (See CCWRC Child Abuse Reporting Policy and Procedures for reporting procedures)
  • Executive Director or Assistant Executive Director will be immediately notified
  • If allegation is against a paid or unpaid staff, immediate suspension until a determination is made
  • Termination of employment when there is a finding of abuse against paid or unpaid staff

FOR CCWRC SHELTER RESIDENTS AND CLIENTS AT CCWRC LOCATIONS

Scope of Policy

This policy and its provisions shall apply to all residents of our shelter, located at the Centre County Women’s Resource Center (CCWRC), 140 W. Nittany Avenue. Additionally, it applies to any clients receiving non-shelter services at either the CCWRC State College or Bellefonte locations.

Supervision

When a parent has children (anyone under the age of 18) with them at either of our locations, State College or Bellefonte, that parent takes full responsibility for the welfare of their child. In the instance the client needs and/or requests for someone else to care for their child/children, or to spend time counseling the child/children, the above “Safe Sanctuary” policy must be adhered to.

The training and screening pieces of the Safe Sanctuary model must be strictly followed. That is, for all persons seeking to work with children at CCWRC or as part of a CCWRC event/activity at a different location, that person (staff, intern and/or volunteer) shall have already participated in the following:

  • The PCAR and PCADV 80 hour training through the CCWRC or another PA equivalent program
  • A thorough orientation to this policy in which a Director of CCWRC has supervised and acknowledged that the staff, intern, or volunteer fully understands
  • Child and criminal abuse clearances, and fingerprints

Summary

If a client is receiving services at one of our locations and would like to have their child supervised or counseled by another adult, that adult has to adhere to the above guidelines. NO other adult on premises can care for a child at our location.

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Scent-Free Policy

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors DATE

Policy Statement:

Due to health concerns arising from exposure to scented products, CCWRC is a Scent-free environment

Background:

A Scent-free environment helps create a safe and healthy workplace. Fragrances from personal care products, air fresheners, candles and cleaning products have been associated with adversely affecting a person’s health including headaches, upper respiratory symptoms, shortness of breath, and difficulty with concentration. People with allergies and asthma report that certain odors, even in small amounts, can cause asthma symptoms.  CCWRC will work with building management to ensure that products used to clean the workplace are fragrance-free and follow best practices to limit employee exposure to cleaning chemicals.  CCWRC recognizes the hazards caused by exposure to scented products and cleaning chemicals and we have a policy to provide a scent-free environment for all employees and visitors to keep a safe and healthy workplace environment. This policy applies to both employees and non-employee visitors of CCWRC.

Policy Implementation:

  1. CCWRC expects that all offices and spaces used by the staff and their visitors remain free of scented products.
  2. Personal care products such as cologne, perfume, aftershave lotions, scented lotions, fragranced hair products and/or similar products are not to be worn in the facilities owned and operated by CCWRC including company owned vehicles.
  3. Use of air fresheners and candles are prohibited from the facilities owned and operated by CCWRC including company owned vehicles.
  4. Use of cleaning products other than those purchased by the CCWRC building management is prohibited for cleaning personal workspaces.
  5. Notices that painting, floor waxing or shampooing, or spraying will be conducted will be posted one week beforehand so that affected personnel can make arrangements or have their duties modified during that time.
  6. Employees required by medical necessity to use medicinal lotions or skin creams that contain odors perceptible to others may request a reasonable accommodation from their supervisor, the COO or the CFO.

Notification Procedures

  1. Employees will be informed of the CCWRC Scent-free Policy through signs posted throughout properties owned and operated by CCWRC including company-owned vehicle
  2. Visitors will be informed of the CCWRC Scent-free Policy by their host, meeting invitations, email correspondences and signs posted throughout the properties owned and operated by CCWRC.
  3. Optional email signatures and posters will state: “Share the Air – CCWRC promotes a Smoke-free, Scent-free Workplace.”
  4. Any employee with a concern about scents or odors should contact her/his director, the COO or the CFO.

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Smoke-Free Workplace Policy

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors 1/17/17

Introduction

The CCWRC is committed to providing a safe and healthy workplace and to promoting the health and wellbeing of its employees. As required by the Pennsylvania Clean Indoor Air Act and also motivated by our desire to provide a healthy work environment for our employees, the following smoking policy has been adopted and shall apply to all employees of the CCWRC.

Policy

It is the policy of the CCWRC to prohibit smoking on all company premises in order to provide and maintain a safe and healthy work environment for all employees. The law defines smoking as the “act of lighting, smoking or carrying a lighted or smoldering cigar, cigarette or pipe of any kind.” This policy included in this policy is any electronic smoking device.

Effective Date

This policy will become effective on Monday, November 28, 2016.

Scope

The Smoke-Free Workplace policy applies to:

  • All areas of buildings occupied by company employees.
  • All company-sponsored off-site conferences and meetings.
  • All vehicles owned or leased by the company.
  • All visitors (customers and vendors) to company premises.
  • All contractors and consultants and/or their employees working on company premises.
  • All temporary employees.
  • All student interns.
  • All volunteers.
  • All shelter residents.

Smoking is permitted in the backyard of the CCWRC building at 140 W. Nittany Ave.

Procedures

We believe that the spirit of thoughtfulness and cooperation which is characteristic at the company is adequate to resolve any disputes which might arise under this policy. Where disputes cannot be so resolved, the rights of the nonsmoker shall be given precedence, as required by Pennsylvania Clean Indoor Air Act.

Employees who violate this smoking policy will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including immediate discharge.

Resolving complaints about smoking:

  • Any complaints about the application of the policy to the workplace should be brought to the attention of your immediate supervisor for resolution.
  • The complaint should be submitted in writing and identify specific objections. the CCWRC will investigate the complaint and resolve it in accordance with the policy.
  • No employee shall suffer any form of retaliation for raising a complaint or asking a question about this policy.

Our smoking policy is intended to comply with requirements of the Pennsylvania Clean Indoor Air Act.

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Staff Travel Reimbursement Policy

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors November 2015

Due to the nature of our organization and the multiple locations we operate, each employee is assigned a primary work location for purposes including mileage reimbursement calculation. This policy revision has been created to eliminate the confusion regarding mileage reimbursement and to reimburse everyone fairly and in a uniform manner.

A.  Travel Reimbursements are paid out every two weeks through Paychex and are direct deposited along with your pay. Travel Reimbursement requests are to be given to the Bookkeeper along with each time sheet or with just the final time sheet of the month. An approved voucher can also be requested prior to the end of the month and given to the Bookkeeper and/or Director of Administration/CFO for reimbursement. If a request is made before direct deposits are paid, a check will be processed for reimbursement.  Reimbursement requests must be submitted not longer than 45 days after the expense is incurred.  Requests submitted more than 45 days after the expense is incurred will not be reimbursed.

B.  Travel between your primary work location and home is not reimbursed, unless you are called out for an emergency situation that occurs outside your normal work hours. Some people have multiple primary locations, based on scheduled shifts and job responsibilities.

C.  Mileage accrued in the course of performing a backup shift is reimbursed.

D.  Mileage accrued between your home and a CCWRC special event or board meeting at which your attendance is considered paid work time is reimbursable.

E.  Mileage accrued within your normal working hours that occurs at a time of day that you travel from and return to your primary workplace is reimbursed.

F.  Mileage accrued in the course of attending a conference remains reimbursable, per previous policies. If you attend a conference that begins early enough that you are unable to go to your primary workplace first, your net mileage from home to the conference is reimbursable. If you go to your primary workplace prior to driving to the conference, the mileage between your primary workplace and the conference is reimbursed. The same principles apply in reverse for your return trip.

G.  Expenses incurred for out of area travel expenses: A staff member who has been approved for CCWRC related conferences or travel for educational leave will not be required to fund expenses personally.  These expenses will be approved and scheduled in coordination with their supervisor.  Expenses will be paid via CCWRC check or credit card.  (Educational leave is defined in the Employee Policies and Procedures Handbook, Part VI, Section J, 3.)  Advance payment will be made for anticipated and reasonable expenses, not to exceed the federal per diem allowance.

H.  During your normal work hours, net mileage will be reimbursed using the “First Trip In, Last Trip Out” method of calculation, explained as follows:

If you have a meeting or appointment that you will attend prior to reaching your primary workplace, during your normal work hours, you will be reimbursed for the mileage accrued in excess of your normal mileage to your primary workplace.

If you have a meeting or appointment toward the end of your normal workday and you will go home, you will be reimbursed for the mileage accrued in excess of your normal mileage to your home.

To determine net mileage, you must first determine the mileage accrued between your home and primary workplace. When you have an appointment that is either the First Trip In for the day or the Last Trip Out (as described above), you need to calculate the total number of miles traveled and subtract the amount of mileage you normally travel between home and your primary workplace.

Total Miles – Normal Commuting Miles = Reimbursable Miles

Examples of these calculations are listed below. If there are any questions regarding these policies or calculations, please see the Bookkeeper or Director of Administration/CFO for clarification. Prior to approving reimbursement sheets, Directors should carefully review calculations for accuracy.

EXAMPLES OF “FIRST IN, LAST OUT” MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENT

Susan’s primary location is Bellefonte. She has a meeting with a client in State College at 4:00, after which she will go home. Susan’s mileage from Bellefonte to home is 12 miles, but by going to the meeting she has accrued 17 miles for the trip to State College.
The amount of mileage she is reimbursed is 5 miles.

Janie’s primary location is Bellefonte. She comes to staff meeting in State College every Monday before going to Bellefonte. Janie’s mileage from home to her office is 40 miles, but coming to State College first makes her trip a total of 53 miles.
The amount of mileage she is reimbursed is 13 miles.

EXAMPLES OF OTHER MILEAGE REIMBURSEMENTS

Katie is the staff representative for the board meeting, which begins at 5:30 PM. She goes home before coming to the meeting.
She is reimbursed for all mileage accrued in this trip.

Caley is staffing a table event at the HUB on campus to give students information about the center and dating violence.
She is reimbursed for all mileage accrued in this trip.

Trisha is the On-Call staff back-up for a shift and is at home when she receives a call to go to the hospital for a SART.
She is reimbursed for all mileage between her home and the hospital.

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Use of CCWRC’s Vehicle and Transportation Policy

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors October 18, 2016

CCWRC’s contract with the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence requires that we help to provide transportation for clients to various destinations such as school, work, court, non-emergency medical and / or social service appointments, etc.  This policy will set forth the rules and procedures for providing this transportation.

  1. CCWRC will insure and maintain a vehicle to provide transportation for clients.
  1. Only CCWRC staff, with a valid PA driver’s license and who have been added to our insurance policy, will be permitted to operate the vehicle.
  1. Travel outside of Centre County requires advance approval from the Executive Director or her/his designee.
  1. The primary purpose of owning the CCWRC vehicle is to transport clients. Other uses will be determined in accordance with the guidelines in our Vehicle and Transportation Procedures.
  1. All drivers will abide by all applicable laws in operating the vehicle.
  1. All drivers will operate and maintain the vehicle according to manufacturer’s requirements.
  1. All drivers will complete daily travel logs for each use, which includes identification of the driver, starting and ending mileage and documentation of amount of gasoline purchased.
  1. The gasoline tank is to be refilled if it is at or below one-half of a tank.
  1. The use of Cellular telephones while operating the vehicle is strictly prohibited. This includes both talk and text.
  1. All drivers will report any malfunctioning of the vehicle immediately to the Director of Administration.
  1. All drivers will report any accident or traffic violation, no matter how minor, to the Director of Administration.
  1. The use of personal vehicles to transport CCWRC clients is prohibited.
  1. All CCWRC job descriptions specify the need for staff members to have a reliable means of personal transportation to perform her/his job duties.  The CCWRC will reimburse staff up to the standard mileage rate established each calendar year for required staff travel.  Expenses incurred above the standard mileage rate will be the responsibility of the employee.

This policy was adopted on October 18, 2016 by the CCWRC Board of Directors and replaces all previous policies regarding transportation.

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Whistleblower Policy

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors DATE

Centre County Women’s Resource Center (CCWRC) requires all members of the board of directors, employees, and volunteers (“CCWRC Representatives”) to observe the highest standard of professionalism and ethics in the conduct of their duties and responsibilities. All CCWRC Representatives must fulfill their duties and responsibilities with honesty and integrity and must comply with all laws and regulations applicable to the CCWRC.  In line with this commitment, the CCWRC Board of Directors has established the following policy for submission and handling of concerns involving suspected instances of wrongdoing or violation of laws or regulations applicable to the CCWRC.

1. Submission of Suspected Violations
Any party having concerns involving suspected instances of ethical wrongdoing or suspected violation of laws or regulations applicable to the CCWRC, should submit their concern, orally or in writing, to the Executive Director.  If the suspected violation involves the Executive Director, communication of the concern should be directed to the Chair of the Board of Directors.

2. Handling of Suspected Violations
Upon receipt of any communication, the Executive Director, or the Chair of the Board of Directors, (“Investigating Officer”) shall provide written acknowledgment of receipt of the concern to the complainant.  The Investigating Officer shall promptly investigate the concern and, if warranted, take appropriate corrective action.  At each meeting of the Board of Directors, the Investigating Officer shall present a report containing the following information with respect to any communication involving suspected violations:  a description of the suspected violation; whether or not the suspected violation resulted in the commencement of a formal investigation; and the status of each formal investigation.

3. No Retaliation
This Whistleblower Policy is intended to encourage and enable representatives to report retaliation, or in the case of an employee, to prevent suffering any adverse employment consequences. Any representative who retaliates against someone for reporting a suspected violation in good faith is subject to discipline, including dismissal from his or her position with the CCWRC. No representative who in good faith reports a suspected violation shall suffer any adverse consequences.

4. Acting in Good Faith
Anyone reporting a suspected violation in line with this policy must be acting in good faith and have reasonable grounds for believing that the information disclosed indicates a violation of law or ethical rule. Any allegation that proves to be false or unsubstantiated, and that proves to have been made maliciously or knowingly, will be viewed as a serious offense requiring disciplinary action, including dismissal from the CCWRC.

5. Confidentiality
To the extent possible, reports of suspected violations, and investigation pertaining to such suspected violation, shall be kept confidential consistent with the need to conduct an adequate investigation. Disclosure of reports of concerns to individuals not involved in the investigation may be viewed as a serious disciplinary offense and may result in discipline including dismissal from the CCWRC.

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Workplace Violence Policy

Approved by CCWRC Board of Directors DATE

It is the policy of Centre County Women’s Resource Center (CCWRC) to promote a safe working environment – free of acts of violence – for all its employees.

The CCWRC is committed to working with all employees to maintain a safe work environment, free from violence, threats of violence, harassment, intimidation and other disruptive behaviors. (See Attachment C, Harassment Policy, in the Employee Policies and Procedures).

Employees are encouraged to immediately report any incidents of workplace violence or any circumstances (including non-work related situations that have the potential of becoming a workplace violence incident) that raise their concern for safety while at work.

Reports of incidents of workplace violence should be made to the employee’s supervisor, and the Executive Director (or Director of Administration if the Executive Director is unavailable). Threats or violence/assaults that pose immediate danger require immediate attention by law enforcement. In such circumstances, immediately contact police at 911, hit the panic button if within reach, or scream for help.

All reported incidents will be properly documented by the CCWRC employee targeted and her/his supervisor and shall be thoroughly investigated by the Personnel Committee of the Board. Such investigations will be limited only by legal implications of employee rights or privacy issues that might be raised by the efforts to investigate and respond to such reports of threats and violence.

The CCWRC will endeavor to respond to threats and violence with appropriate security measures including but not limited to: modification of check-in procedures for all visitors and training attendees; immediately contacting law enforcement organization(s); pursuing legal remedies such as trespassing ordinances; and referral of employees to appropriate outside resources such as crisis counselors or domestic violence programs with which the CCWRC has a reciprocal relationship.

Violence in the workplace initiated by a CCWRC employee will be dealt with under the Disciplinary Action Policy (Employee Policies and Procedures, Section III.D.) and may result in immediate termination.

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Acknowledgement of Policy Receipt and Compliance  (update)

Americans with Disabilities Act
I have received a copy of the CCWRC Americans with Disability Act, have reviewed this policy with my supervisor, and agree to abide by its guidelines.

Signed:  ________________________________________

Code of Ethics
I have received a copy of the CCWRC Ethics Policy, have reviewed this policy with my supervisor, and agree to abide by its guidelines.

Signed:  ________________________________________

Communications Policy
I have received a copy of the CCWRC Communications Policy, have reviewed this policy with my supervisor, and agree to abide by its guidelines.

Signed:  ________________________________________

Confidentiality Policy
I have received a copy of the CCWRC Confidentiality Policy, have reviewed this policy with my supervisor, and agree to abide by its guidelines.

Signed:  ________________________________________

Conflict of Interest Policy
I have received a copy of the CCWRC Conflict of Interest Policy, have reviewed this policy with my supervisor, and agree to abide by its guidelines.

Signed:  ________________________________________

Drug and Alcohol Policy
I have received a copy of the CCWRC Drug & Alcohol Policy, have reviewed this policy with my supervisor, and agree to abide by its guidelines.

Signed:  ________________________________________

Equal Employment Opportunity
I have received a copy of the CCWRC Equal Employment Opportunity, have reviewed this policy with my supervisor, and agree to abide by its guidelines.

Signed:  ________________________________________

Guidelines Regarding Work Attire
I have received a copy of the CCWRC Guidelines Regarding Work Attire, have reviewed this policy with my supervisor, and agree to abide by its guidelines.

Signed:  ________________________________________

Harassment Policy
I have received a copy of the CCWRC Harassment Policy, have reviewed this policy with my supervisor, and agree to abide by its guidelines.

Signed:  ________________________________________

Inclement Weather/Closing Policy
I have received a copy of the CCWRC Inclement Weather/Closing Policy, have reviewed this policy with my supervisor, and agree to abide by its guidelines.

Signed:  ________________________________________

Non-Discrimination Policy
I have received a copy of the CCWRC Non-Discrimination Policy, have reviewed this policy with my supervisor, and agree to abide by its guidelines.

Signed:  ________________________________________

Religious Non-Affiliation Policy
I have received a copy of the CCWRC Religious Non-Affiliation Policy, have reviewed this policy with my supervisor, and agree to abide by its guidelines.

Signed:  ________________________________________

Scent-Free Policy
I have received a copy of the CCWRC Scent-Free Policy, have reviewed this policy with my supervisor, and agree to abide by its guidelines.

Signed:  ________________________________________

Staff Travel Reimbursement Policy
I have received a copy of the CCWRC Staff Travel Reimbursement Policy, have reviewed this policy with my supervisor, and agree to abide by its guidelines.

Signed:  ________________________________________

Use of CCWRC’s Vehicle and Transportation Policy
I have received a copy of the CCWRC Use of CCWRC’s Vehicle and Transportation Policy, have reviewed this policy with my supervisor, and agree to abide by its guidelines.

Signed:  ________________________________________

Whistleblower Policy
I have received a copy of the CCWRC Whistleblower Policy, have reviewed this policy with my supervisor, and agree to abide by its guidelines.

Signed:  ________________________________________

Workplace Violence Policy
I have received a copy of the CCWRC Workplace Violence Policy, have reviewed this policy with my supervisor, and agree to abide by its guidelines.

Signed:  ________________________________________

Printed Name:  ___________________________________

Date:  ___________________________

Witnessed:  _____________________________________

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RECRUITMENT, HIRING, AND DEVELOPMENT

Recruitment

1.  The Executive Director has primary responsibility for recruitment. The primary responsibility for recruitment of a new Executive Director lies with the Chair of the Board.

2.  Recruitment (except in the case of the Executive Director) shall normally be made initially through postings at the CCWRC and job announcements mailed to all CCWRC volunteers. If this process does not elicit an adequate pool of qualified candidates, the committee will recruit externally.  The Executive Director may conduct simultaneous internal and external searches if the situation warrants.  External recruitment shall be made through the use of classified advertisements in newspapers.  In addition, job announcements will be mailed to the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence (PCADV), the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape (PCAR), the Centre County Department of Public Welfare, the Private Industry Council of Centre County (PICCC), area minority groups, Penn State, women’s organizations, and other local agencies.  Executive Director searches will always involve simultaneous internal and external postings, as described above.

3.  Announcements shall include a statement that the CCWRC is an equal opportunity employer and an affirmative action employer.

4.  Current employees and volunteers shall be made aware of openings and the prerequisites to qualify for any position by postings of announcements in the volunteer office and the distribution of the position announcement to all staff and volunteer Counselor/Advocates. Staff and volunteer Counselor/Advocates may apply prior to or concurrently with the beginning of external recruitment.

5.  Former Board members of the CCWRC may apply for positions; however, current Board members are ineligible for employment.

6.  All applicants (both internal and external) must submit a letter, résumé, and list of references by the stated deadline. Depending on the position, additional information and/or materials may be requested as a part of the application process.

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Selection

1.  The Hiring Committee shall consist of the Executive Director and the Director of the team in which the position resides. If the position to be filled is a Team Director, one of the other Directors shall serve on the Hiring Committee.

2.  The Hiring Committee shall review all applications to determine which applicants shall be interviewed.

3.  The Hiring Committee shall interview the final candidates, check references, and make the final decision. The Hiring Committee shall also consider input from other staff members participating in the interview process.

4.  When the Executive Director’s position is to be filled, the Chair of the Board shall form and chair the Screening Committee. The members of the committee must be approved by the Board.  The committee must include, but is not limited to, the Vice-Chair of the Board, a volunteer Counselor/Advocate, , and one member of the paid staff.  The committee shall advertise the position, review applications, interview candidates, and recommend a pool of finalists to the Board of Directors.  All paid staff, interested volunteers, and other board members shall have an opportunity to interview final candidates and provide input to the Screening Committee.  The Board of Directors is responsible for selection and appointment of the Executive Director.  Notification of the appointment of the new Executive Director will go to all funding sources.

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Family (Defined in Section VI.H.1.) or Romantic/Sexual Relationships as a Matter of Concern in Regard to CCWRC Employment

1.  The CCWRC will not employ family members or partners of current employees. This does not preclude having short-term contractual arrangements with family members.

2.  Romantic and/or sexual relationships between staff can be problematic in the workplace. Particularly when there is a supervisory relationship, there is the potential for adverse consequences, including charges of sexual harassment.  Even when both parties have consented to the relationship, there may be perceptions by others of conflict of interest or unfair treatment.  Such perceptions undermine the atmosphere of trust essential to the workplace environment.

If a consensual relationship develops between supervisor and staff, the supervisor must report the relationship to the Executive Director.  Once the relationship is reported, the Executive Director is responsible for addressing the conflict of interest to the fullest feasible extent and ensuring that fair and objective processes are in place for decisions relative to recommendations, promotions, salary increases, and performance evaluations.  An alternate supervisory arrangement should be defined, documented, and implemented.

If a consensual relationship develops between any two staff, this information should be shared with each employee’s supervisor and the Executive Director.  As appropriate, the Executive Director will address this situation.

If the Executive Director is involved in a consensual relationship, s/he will inform the Chair of the Board.

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Employee Orientation and Development

1.  All new employees shall receive an orientation packet that will include, at a minimum: (a-i could be links)

a.  Background information regarding the history and accomplishments of the CCWRC
b.  The CCWRC strategic plan
c.  An explanation of the funding base and implications regarding position permanence
d.  Employee Policies and Procedures
e.  A current job description
f.  Bylaws of the CCWRC
g.  Drug and Alcohol Policy
h.  Confidentiality Agreement
i.  Nondiscrimination Policy

2.  All new employees must complete an Act 33 application within the initial week of employment and be approved for clearance. The approval must be kept in each employee’s personnel file.  Satisfactory reports from the Act 33 and Criminal Record Check are required for continued employment.

3.  All new employees must sign a statement to be witnessed by the employee’s supervisor, stating that s/he understands and will comply with:

a.  The Drug and Alcohol Policy (could be links)
b.  The Confidentiality Policy
c.  The Employee Policies and Procedures

4.  All new employees must attend and successfully complete the first available CCWRC Counselor/Advocate training program.

5.  Full-time staff are encouraged to participate in conferences/workshops/programs that are directly related and beneficial to their work at the CCWRC. The employee must submit a conference request form to her/his supervisor for approval prior to the conference.  Pre-approved conferences are considered compensable work time.  Conference fees may be paid by the CCWRC, based on yearly budgetary allocations for this expense and prior approval of the supervisor.

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PERSONNEL PROCEDURES FOR ALL EMPLOYEES OF THE CENTRE COUNTY WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER

Evaluations are intended to assess areas of strength and needed growth, encourage self-improvement, give employees opportunities to discuss job satisfaction and concerns, evaluate the employee’s professional development needs, and improve the operations and services of the CCWRC. (Link to PMT documents from this section?)

Preliminary Evaluation Period for All Staff

1.  New employees hired internally, having served previously as volunteer Counselor/Advocates or paid staff, will serve a preliminary evaluation period of three months. New employees hired from outside the CCWRC will serve a preliminary evaluation period of six months.

2.  A written evaluation of the employee’s strengths and areas needing improvement relative to her/his job description will be completed by the employee’s supervisor at the close of the preliminary evaluation period (3 months for internal hires, 6 months for external hires). This evaluation may incorporate feedback of coworkers.  The evaluation of new employees hired from outside the CCWRC shall incorporate feedback from the Volunteer Coordinator.

The evaluation and a memo summarizing any recommendations and/or goals shall be discussed by the supervisor and the new employee and approved by the Executive Director.  Final copies of the evaluation must be signed by the employee, the supervisor, and initialed by the Executive Director, indicating that the evaluation has been reviewed and discussed.  The signed evaluation shall be placed in the employee’s personnel file.

3.  If this first evaluation is unsatisfactory, the supervisor and the Executive Director will meet immediately to determine the appropriateness of extending the probationary period. The Executive Director and the supervisor may extend the preliminary evaluation period for up to an additional three months to address the concerns raised in the evaluation.

4.  If, during the preliminary evaluation (or extended preliminary) period, the Executive Director and the supervisor agree that the employee’s performance is unsatisfactory, then both shall meet with the employee and give written notice of immediate termination with one week’s pay.

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Annual Performance Evaluations for All Staff

 1.  Between April 1 and June 30 each year, each employee shall have an annual written evaluation completed by the employee’s direct supervisor and reveiwed by the Executive Director. The supervisor is responsible for initiating the evaluation process.  Evaluation forms shall be distributed to the employee’s team with a designated deadline for written feedback.  In the case of Team Directors, evaluation forms shall also be distributed to other Team Directors.    The employee will prepare a self-evaluation.  The employee’s self-evaluation and the evaluations from colleagues will be considered in the final evaluation prepared by the supervisor.

2.  Upon completion of the written evaluation, the supervisor will provide copies of her/his evaluation, the evaluations of the employee’s colleagues, and the self-evaluation to the employee for review. The supervisor and the employee will meet to discuss the evaluation and goals for further professional development.  The supervisor may then edit or add to her/his final evaluation if s/he feels it necessary.

The final evaluation must be signed by the employee, the supervisor, and initialed by the Executive Director.  The employee’s signature means that the employee has read and understood the evaluation but does not imply agreement.  The employee may write a response to the evaluation. The final evaluation, the employee’s self-evaluation and any response shall be kept in the employee’s personnel file.

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Grievances

 1.  Definitions: “Grievances” are defined as complaints filed by personnel alleging violations, misinterpretations, or misapplications of established policies and procedures.  A grievance may be caused by a decision that is considered arbitrary, capricious, unreasonable, unfair, or discriminatory.  Gripes, personality differences, or general nonspecific complaints do not constitute grievances.  An employee may use this procedure without fear of prejudice or reprisal.

“Days” mean working days.

2.  It is the policy of the CCWRC to encourage a harmonious and cooperative relationship among employees and to resolve employee grievances in accordance with fair and orderly procedures.

3.  Applicability: The procedures described in this part of the Policies shall be applicable to grievances arising from conditions that are subject to the control of the Executive Director and that involve employee safety or health, physical facilities, surroundings, material or equipment, supervisory and disciplinary practices, assignment of work hours, administration of leave, workload, and other similar conditions of employment, but shall not be applicable to position classification actions or performance evaluation reports.  Former staff may file grievances within 30 days of their termination.

4.  Procedures: The Executive Director shall implement procedures and instructions for resolving employee grievances consistent with the basic steps prescribed in the following subsections.  No employee shall interfere with or restrain employees in the exercise of their rights under such procedures.

a.  First step: An employee or employees with a grievance shall first discuss it with her/his supervisor, who shall attempt to resolve the grievance to the mutual satisfaction of the employee(s) and management within five days after its presentation.  If the grievance is between the supervisor and the employee, the employee shall discuss the concern with the Executive Director.

If the matter is not satisfactorily settled on an informal basis, the staff member may, within five days of the failure of the informal resolution process, submit to her/his supervisor a formal written grievance setting forth the specific nature of the complaint.  The supervisor must respond in writing to the staff member within five days.

b.  Second step: If the employee is not satisfied with the disposition of the grievance at the first step, s/he may submit a written appeal to the Executive Director, setting forth the specific nature of the complaint, and may request an in-person meeting with the Executive Director and the supervisor.  The Executive Director must respond in writing within three days, and the meeting with the staff member must occur within five days, if such a meeting is requested.

If the Executive Director is the supervisor of the grieving employee, the employee goes directly to the third step.

c.  Third step: If the matter is still not satisfactorily resolved, the staff member, within five days of the receipt of the response from the Executive Director or the meeting with the Executive Director and the supervisor, may submit a written request to the Chair of the Personnel Committee asking that the issue be presented to the Personnel Committee for its review and action.  For all grievance procedures, the Personnel Committee will not include the Executive Director or the staff representative.  The Personnel Committee Chair must respond to the staff member filing the grievance in writing within ten days of the receipt of the request.

The Personnel Committee (including only its Board members) has the option of responding in writing to the staff member or setting a date for a formal hearing on the grievance.  Written responses are usually utilized only when policy statements are available that respond directly to the grievance.  Hearings are usually scheduled for those items where policy does not exist, where existing policy is unclear, or the application of policy is felt to need review by the Personnel Committee.

If a hearing is scheduled, all parties to the grievance are expected to be present during the presentation of information related to the grievance.  The secretary of the Board will take notes.

The Personnel Committee (Board members only) must respond in writing within ten days of the hearing to the staff member who has filed the grievance.  The Personnel Committee is the last step in the grievance process.  Their determination is final and binding.  The Personnel Committee must provide a report on all grievances and actions by the Committee to the Board of Directors at the next scheduled meeting of the Board of Directors.

Nothing in this section shall restrict the Executive Director’s authority to take disciplinary action against an employee as described in Section D below.

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Disciplinary Action

 1.  In most cases of employee misconduct, CCWRC will follow the disciplinary procedures outlined below.  However, CCWRC retains the discretion to forgo any step of these disciplinary procedures and/or to immediately terminate any employee if the circumstances warrant such action.

2.  Examples of conduct that may require action are:

a.  Failure to meet position performance expectations
b.  Violation of terms of employment
c.  Misconduct
d.  Violation of confidentiality
e.  Any other unprofessional conduct

3.  Procedures:

a.  Formal disciplinary action.

(1)  Following the preliminary evaluation period, disciplinary action may be instituted against a CCWRC employee when concerns about the employee’s performance have not been addressed by on-going supervision.  When necessary, the employee’s supervisor shall meet with the employee to discuss the problem and appropriate corrective action.  That meeting shall be documented in a written report, which shall outline the plan for corrective action, including a timeline for compliance.  The report shall be given to the employee, signed by the supervisor and the employee, and following review and initialing by the Executive Director, copied to the employee’s file.

(2)  If the problem previously identified continues to exist at the conclusion of the time agreed upon for compliance in the plan for corrective action, the situation will be re-evaluated by the employee’s supervisor and the Executive Director.   The Executive Director and the supervisor shall determine whether further disciplinary action is appropriate or termination of the employee is warranted.  Further disciplinary action may include, but is not limited to, intensified supervision, suspension with pay, or suspension without pay.  If further disciplinary action is determined to be helpful, the plan for corrective action will be amended to include the action decided upon, including a new time line for compliance, and shall be signed by the employee, the supervisor, and the Executive Director and copied to the Personnel Committee.  The amended plan for corrective action shall be placed in the employee’s personnel file.

b.  Termination.

If there has been inadequate improvement, the supervisor and the Executive Director may initiate termination procedures.  In such cases, the Executive Director will submit a report to the Personnel Committee concerning the grounds for the termination.  The Executive Director, in consultation with the employee’s supervisor, shall determine an appropriate timeline for the employee’s separation from the CCWRC.  The employee will be informed at the time of termination that a grievance may be filed regarding the termination within thirty days of the termination.

c.  Immediate dismissal or suspension.

Grounds for immediate dismissal include but are not limited to failure to comply with the Center’s Nondiscrimination Policy, evidence of physically or psychologically abusive behavior, theft or destruction of Center property, possession/use/sale/distribution of alcohol or illegal drugs on CCWRC property, unequivocal violation of the confidentiality policy, or falsifying or altering CCWRC records. The Executive Director may immediately dismiss or immediately suspend an employee with pay pending further review.

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Resignation or Termination

1.  An employee is expected to provide one month but a minimum of two weeks’ notice of intent to terminate her/his employment via written notification to the supervisor, with a copy to the Executive Director. This letter must include the effective date of resignation.

2.  The employee who gives required notice will be paid for unused accumulated vacation days upon departure (up to a maximum of 25 days, or a total of 200 hours). Departing employees will not be paid for unused accumulated sick days or personal days.

3.  An employee whose services are terminated due to funding reductions is entitled to any accrued vacation leave.

4.  During the two-week period following notice, the employee must work for at least five days, or 40 hours, including the last day of employment. Employees can be compensated for a maximum of five days, or 40 hours, of paid time off during the last two weeks of employment.

5.  The Executive Director or a Board member named by the Personnel Committee shall conduct an exit interview with each departing employee. The Director of Shelter Services will conduct the exit interview with overnight and weekend staff.

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Personnel Records for All Staff

1.  The CCWRC Executive Director maintains a confidential personnel file for each employee. This file includes: (any links?)

a.  Forms related to hiring (W-4, I-9)
b.  CCWRC training certificate and syllabus from the training attended
c.  Annual performance evaluations
d.  All other material relating to performance (letters of disciplinary action, formal or informal commendations, etc.)
e.  Professional development attendance records
f.  Salary history
g.  Signed copy of job description
h.  The Act 33 and Act 34 clearances (copies or originals)
i.  Signed confidentiality statement
j.  Signed copy of Drug & Alcohol Policy agreement
k.  Signed receipt for any keys issued and/or equipment that is removed from the Center
l.  Signed receipt of the Employee Policies and Procedures
m.  Termination or resignation letter
n.  Copy of the exit data form and receipt of returned keys and equipment

2.  Each employee has the prerogative to review her/his own file. In consultation with the Executive Director, supervisors may review the files for employees whom they supervise.  During disciplinary actions, the Personnel Committee shall have access to the employee’s file.

3.  Each employee has the prerogative to request the correction, addition, or removal of information from her/his file. The request shall be initiated with the supervisor and appealed to the Executive Director and then to the Personnel Committee.

4.  Personnel files shall be stored in a secure, locked place for ten years.

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Personnel Procedures Relating to the Executive Director

The Chair of the Board serves as the Executive Director’s supervisor.  The same personnel procedures apply to the Executive Director as to other staff, with the exceptions noted below.

1.  The preliminary evaluation period will be six months.

2.  Input from the Board of Directors will be solicited for any evaluation of the Executive Director (preliminary or annual).

3.  The Executive Director’s personnel file will be kept in a designated Board of Directors drawer in a file cabinet in the Center. Only the Executive Committee of the Board will have access to these files.  The Executive Director’s personnel file will be kept for ten years beyond the date of the termination of employment.

4.  The Executive Director will give no less than one month’s notice of intent to resign.

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EMPLOYEE CLASSIFICATION AND DEFINITIONS

Classifications

Salary Classification Classification
Description
Part-Time (PT)

or

Full-

Time (FT)

Exempt (E)

or

Non-Exempt (NE)

Eligible

For

Benefits

Minimum Hours Per Payroll Week Maximum Hours Per Payroll Week Overtime Pay Rate For 40+ Hours Worked In A Payroll Week Rate Paid For CCWRC Holidays
A Overnight/Weekend Shelter Staff PT NE N N/A 40 150% of
Hourly  Rate
150% of Hourly  Rate
B Direct Service Staff PT NE N N/A 40 150% of
Hourly  Rate
N/A
B Direct Service Staff FT NE Y 40 40 150% of
Hourly  Rate
N/A
C Coordinators/Case Managers FT E Y N/A N/A N/A N/A
D Directors FT E Y N/A N/A N/A N/A
E Temporary Employees PT NE N N/A 40 150% of
Hourly  Rate
150% of Hourly  Rate

CHART 1  – Employee Classifications
Y = Yes
N = No
N/A = Not Applicable

See Chart 1, attached. (moved chart to this section)

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Process for Classification Review and Adjustment

Reclassification is the redefining of a position’s duties and responsibilities, which results    in a new job description and/or pay grade.  The process of reclassification can be initiated by either the employee or the employee’s supervisor.

1.  A supervisor may request a reclassification of a position on her/his team by redefining the position’s duties and responsibilities and submitting the new job description to the Executive Director. The Executive Director will evaluate the new description, suggest changes, and recommend a salary adjustment if warranted, all of which shall be presented to the Personnel Committee for concurrence.

2.  An employee may submit a written request for the reclassification of her/his position to the supervisor. If the supervisor agrees with the request, the procedure described above shall be followed.  If the supervisor disagrees with the request, the employee may   appeal in writing to the Executive Director.

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SALARY ADMINISTRATION AND COMPENSATION

Hours of Work: Regular Work Week

 1.  The regular schedule of work comprising full-time employment shall typically be 40 hours per week inclusive of a half-hour paid break daily. Job assignments are designed to be done within the established hours for the position for which an employee is hired.  The staff shall normally maintain the above hours of work, but because of the nature of their work, at certain periods of time it shall not be considered unusual for additional hours to be required.

2.  Part-time staff are paid for the hours they accumulate in the payroll week.

3.  When a decision is made by the Executive Director to close the office (i.e., a weather emergency), the time during which the office is closed will be considered paid time off for Categories B, C, and D , if they were scheduled to be in the office at that time.

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Compensation for Hours Worked Beyond 40

1.  All overtime work and compensation must be approved by the immediate supervisor and the Executive Director in advance, whenever possible.

2.  Nonexempt staff will be compensated for all hours worked in excess of 40 per payroll week at the rate of 150% of their hourly rate. Paid time off is not included in the calculation of hours worked.  On-call pay for backup shifts on holidays will be 150% of normal hourly on-call rate.

3.  Overnight and weekend staff will be compensated at a rate that is 150% of their regular rate of pay on days/nights that are deemed CCWRC holidays.

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Hotline Coverage

1.  All full-time staff are required to assist with on-line and on-call coverage when shifts are not filled by volunteer staff.

2.  Staff are compensated at an hourly rate for on-line and on-call shift coverage. This is the “standby” rate, for the privilege of having a staff member ready to perform backup duties when necessary.  For non-exempt staff, all hours actively engaged performing backup duties (counseling/advocacy/travel, etc.) will be compensated at the staff member’s normal hourly rate and will count toward the total number of hours worked during the payroll week.

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Reimbursement for Expenses Incurred While Providing Direct Service

 1.  Any reasonable out-of-pocket expenses necessitated by providing direct service (e.g., transportation, mileage, food, tolls, phone calls) will be reimbursed. When possible, expenses should be pre-approved.  Receipts are required for reimbursement and must be submitted within 30 days.

2.  Mileage and meals will be reimbursed at a rate established at the beginning of each fiscal year. (link to form?)

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Reimbursement for Attendance at Conferences, Meetings, and Workshops

 1.  Level of reimbursement must be pre-approved by the supervisor.

2.  Mileage and meals will be reimbursed at a rate established at the beginning of each fiscal year. Receipts are required for reimbursement and must be submitted within 30 days.  The CCWRC does not reimburse employees for alcoholic beverages. (link to form?)

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Cost of Living Increases

All employees shall receive cost of living increases, if funding is available, on the first day of the new fiscal year.

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BENEFITS

Employees Assuming a New Position Within the Organization

Employees assuming a new position within the organization will keep their accrued benefits.

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Sick Leave

1.  Sick leave shall be granted for the following reasons:

a.  Employee’s physical or mental health problems
b.  Physical or mental health problems of immediate family members
c.  Appointment with a health care practitioner for (a) or (b)

2.  Full-time employees earn one day, or 8 hours, of sick leave per month.

3.  Accumulated sick leave is not reimbursable upon termination of employment.

4.  During the preliminary evaluation period, employees may earn and use accrued sick leave.

5.  If an employee has used all of her/his accumulated sick leave, additional absences may be charged against accumulated vacation or personal days.

6.  When an employee finds it necessary to use sick leave, s/he must notify her/his supervisor as soon as possible. Employees who have used three days of consecutive sick leave may be required to obtain a doctor’s note before returning to work.

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Temporary Medical Leave Without Pay

 1.  After accrued sick leave, personal days and/or vacation leave have been exhausted, temporary medical leave without pay may be granted. A request for temporary medical leave should be made in writing at least one month in advance when possible.  The request should state intent to return to work within a reasonable period of time after recovery, but total leave (including paid time off) may not exceed six months.

2.  As long as an employee is in “pay” status while on leave (using vacation time, sick leave, etc.) s/he continues to accrue additional sick leave and vacation. However, if an employee is in “nonpay” status while on leave (temporary medical leave, unpaid maternity or child care leave, etc.), s/he does not accrue additional sick leave or vacation.  The unpaid leave has no effect on the employee’s anniversary date for moving to a higher level of vacation or sick leave when s/he returns.

3.  The Executive Director and the employee will establish a mutually agreed upon schedule for the leave. Written approval for the temporary medical leave will be placed in the employee’s personnel file.  The Executive Director may request that the employee’s health care provider verify the employee’s capacity to return to work.

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Leave Bank

The CCWRC Leave Bank provides additional support to full-time employees experiencing extraordinary or catastrophic personal circumstances.  Use of time from the Leave Bank may only be made after the employee has exhausted all other earned leave, including sick leave, vacation, and personal leave.  Extraordinary and/or catastrophic personal circumstances include serious illness or accidents or tragedies that adversely impact upon the employee’s ability to work.  All information concerning donations to and use of the Leave Bank is considered part of the employee’s personnel file and is therefore confidential.

1.  Use of the Leave Bank

a.  An employee may apply for a maximum of eight days, or 64 hours, per request.

b.  An employee may make up to two requests for use of the Leave Bank during one fiscal year.

c.  Leave Bank requests are evaluated by the Executive Director , the employee’s supervisor and the staff representative to the Personnel Committee. In the case of an application by the Executive Director, the CCWRC Personnel Committee shall review the request.

d.  The Executive Director will inform the employee of the response to her/his request.

2.  Contributions to the Leave Bank

a.  Contributions to the Leave Bank are completely voluntary.

b.  Employees may donate no more than five days, or 40 hours, of earned, but unused, sick leave per fiscal year. No other type of leave may be donated.

c.  Contributions to the Leave Bank may be made at any time.

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Vacation Leave

 1.  Full-time employees will accrue vacation time as follows:

Starting Date to 1st Anniversary- – – – – – – – – – – – – –  1 Day/Month (or 8 hours)
1st Anniversary or more- – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 2 Days/Month (or 16 hours)

2.  New full-time employees must have completed three (3) months in their position before becoming eligible to take vacation leave. However, an exception may be granted within the first three months of employment for special circumstances with the approval of the employee’s supervisor.

3.  No more than 12.5 days, or 100 hours, of vacation accrual will be carried forward at the fiscal year end. Exceptions to this policy may only be made with prior approval of the Executive Director and/or Chief Financial Officer.

4.  Written requests for vacation must be submitted to the supervisor. Employees are encouraged to give as much advance notice as possible to ensure the availability of the requested time.

5.  Paid holidays are not charged to vacation or sick leave. However, this policy does not apply to any other types of approved leaves of absence.

6.  Employees may elect to “cash in” unused vacation days when their accrued vacation exceeds 80 hours.  Employees may cash in up to five (5) days or 40 hours of accrued vacation which will be deducted from their accrued time.   No other paid time off may be cashed in.  Employees may elect to cash in their vacation days at one time or throughout the duration of the fiscal year.

Requests must be made in writing to the employee’s supervisor.  The supervisor will submit a copy of the request and a request for check to the Chief Financial Officer   who will process the request.  All requests for vacation cash in must be submitted prior to June 1 of the fiscal year.

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Paid Holidays for Full-Time Staff

1.  There are eight paid holidays every year:

a.  New Year’s Day (January 1)
b.  Memorial Day
c.  Independence Day (July 4)
d.  Labor Day
e.  Thanksgiving Day
f.  Friday following Thanksgiving Day
g.  Christmas Eve
h.  Christmas Day or another religious holiday approved by the Executive Director

2.  Holidays occurring on a Saturday will be observed on the preceding Friday, and holidays occurring on a Sunday will be observed on the following Monday.

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Personal Leave for Full-Time Staff

 1.  Full-time employees shall accrue 4 days, or 32 hours, of personal leave per fiscal year. This personal leave is designed to provide for staff whose religious holidays may be other than those traditionally recognized and for those staff choosing to recognize the national Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday. However, full-time staff may use the time in whatever ways they choose.

Personal days must be used within the fiscal year in which they are earned.

2.  Personal days must be approved by the employee’s supervisor.

3.  Personal days may not be taken within the first three (3) months of employment. However, an exception may be granted within the first three months of employment for special circumstances with the approval of the employee’s supervisor. .

4.  Accumulated personal days are not paid at termination of employment.

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Bereavement Leave for Full-Time Staff

1.  Five days, or 40 hours, of paid bereavement leave shall be granted for a death in the immediate family. This includes mother, father, spouse, partner, children, brother, sister, grandparents, grandparents-in-law, mother-in-law, father-in-law, daughter-in-law, son-in-law, sister-in-law, brother-in-law, niece, nephew, grandchildren, aunt, and uncle.

2.  One day, or 8 hours, paid bereavement leave shall be granted for the death of a close friend or other relative.

3.  If additional bereavement leave is needed, the employee may schedule vacation time, personal days, or a leave of absence without pay after informing her/his supervisor.

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Child-Rearing Leave for Full-Time Staff

1.  Child-rearing leave is a period of time following childbirth or adoption. Six weeks, or 240 hours, of maternity/paternity leave with pay will be provided.

2.  For full-time staff, child-rearing leave may last up to a total of six months, including:

a.  Six weeks, or 240 hours, of maternity/paternity leave with pay.

b.  Any or all accrued sick leave, vacation or personal days.

c.  Without-pay status for the duration of this leave. As long as an employee is in “pay” status while on leave (using vacation time, sick leave, etc.) s/he continues to accrue additional sick leave and vacation.  However, if an employee is in “nonpay” status while on leave (temporary medical leave, unpaid maternity or child care leave, etc.), s/he does not accrue additional sick leave or vacation.  The unpaid leave has no effect on the employee’s anniversary date for moving to a higher level of vacation or sick leave when s/he returns.

d.  Any combination of the above.

3.  Part-time staff are entitled to up to six months of unpaid leave.

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Other Leaves of Absence for Full-Time Staff

1.  Jury Duty: Employees should notify their supervisor when called for jury duty.  Time off will be granted consistent with applicable law.

2.  National Guard or Military Reserve Leave

a.  Employees will be granted a leave of absence for military duty up to a maximum of fifteen days, or 120 hours, in a fiscal year.

b.  An employee will be paid the difference between her/his military pay and her/his regular salary, if military pay is less than CCWRC pay.

3.  Educational Leave

Full-time employees are generally entitled to up to five full days, or 40 hours, of elective paid educational leave per year, subject to the approval of their supervisor.  Educational leave includes conferences and workshops intended to build knowledge and skills directly related to the employee’s position at the Centre County Women’s Resource Center.  Educational leave also may be used to take academic courses that build skills related to the employee’s position.  Funding for such conferences, workshops, and courses will be determined on an annual basis through the budgeting process.  Educational leave does not normally include participation in state Coalition meetings, committees, programs, or activities mandated by CCWRC external funding sources.

4.  Community Service Leave

Full-time employees may take up to 8 hours per year for non-paid, non-political community service.  Community service leave is designed to encourage employees to be actively involved in the community and may be taken all at once (i.e. United Way Day of Caring) or in increments (i.e. donating blood).

Employees may accrue up to 40 hours of community service leave. Accumulated community service leave is not reimbursable upon termination of employment.

Community service leave may only be taken after the preliminary evaluation period has been successfully completed.  Community service leave must be approved by the employee’s supervisor.

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Insurance Benefits

1.  Medical, dental, vision, short-term disability, and life insurance coverage for full-time staff is provided by the CCWRC.

2.  Eligible dependents can be added to the medical, dental and vision policy at the expense of the employee.

3.  Workers’ Compensation Insurance for full-time and part-time staff is provided by the CCWRC. Employees must notify their supervisor immediately following a work-related injury.

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VOLUNTEER COUNSELOR/ADVOCATES

Volunteers are under the supervision of the Volunteer Coordinator Director of Volunteer Services and will have a position description that includes all duties and responsibilities.

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VIII.  The Use of Alcohol/Drugs

See Attachment B.

Employees are required to sign a statement confirming their agreement with the terms of the Drug and Alcohol Policy.

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IX.  Harassment

See Attachment C.

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REVISIONS/UPDATES

(Revision to Sec. VI. E. 3 & 6. Vacation Accrual and “cash-in” approved by CCWRC Board  6/19/2012)

(Revision to Sec. VI. F. Paid Holidays for Full-time Staff approved by CCWRC Board 10/15/2013)

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CCWRC Performance Management Tool Overview Version 2.0

Performance Management System Overview:

The following overview explains the CCWRC Annual Performance Management Review System. This document will aid supervisors and employees in their understanding and implementation of the system overall and the specific forms that are part of the system.

The positions in the CCWRC are now organized according to Job Families. These job families are categorizes that group positions with similar performance expectations together. Examining the job descriptions of each position, and conducting interviews with or surveying members of the organization established performance similarities utilized to categorize each position. These categorizes enable a balance of customization of the management system for the different positions while still enabling the system to be standardized across the center. See Appendix A, B, and C for Job Family breakdowns.

Individual performance will be evaluated by according to specific Competencies assigned to each job family. These competencies may differ slightly in their assessment of specific positions within one general job family. Competencies describe job essential groups of behaviors that indicate different levels of effective performance in a given position. The examination of job descriptions, surveys of members of CCWRC, and interviews of members of CCWRC led to the development of the competency lists for each job family. See Appendix A, B, and C for Competency definitions by Job Family.

Performance Management Tool:

The Behavioral Examples Forms (BEF)

The BEF is the official worksheet for supervisors to use when they complete an annual review of an individual’s performance. There are worksheets for each job family and some worksheets within the job family only apply to certain positions. The BEF is organized by the competencies required of the individual’s position within each job family. Each competency page has behavioral performance examples required by for the position being evaluated. The supervisor must examine each behavioral example and categorize the individual’s performance on that example as ineffective, effective, or highly effective for the entire rating period.

These categories of performance are defined as:

  1. Ineffective – Does not meet the performance requirements of the job
  2. Effective – Meets the performance requirements of the job
  3. Highly Effective – Goes above the expectations of the job

The ratings of behavioral examples are designed to come from objective observations. Though some examples are more subjective by nature, the supervisor must base his/her evaluations on the actual performance of the individual as much as possible. Supervisors should base their evaluation of an individual’s performance on any notes that detail the individual’s performance, products of the individual’s work, and prior work experience with the individual. It is appropriate to consider structured comments from co-workers that can contribute job-relevant input about the individual’s work performance.

When a supervisor goes through one of the sheets on the form, he/she should generally evaluate the individual’s performance and put it into the category of ineffective, effective, or highly effective performance. The supervisor should describe his/her thought process in the comments section on the bottom of the sheet. Once the supervisor rates the individual on all the behavioral examples on the sheet, he/she needs to assign an overall rating of performance on the competency with a number from 1-7. One indicates ineffective performance and 7 represents highly effective performance.

The Performance Management Summary Form (PMSF)

After the supervisor uses the BEF to evaluate the individual’s performance for the review, the supervisor will use the PMSF to summarize their performance feedback. The form captures all the administrative information about the individual whose performance is being evaluated. The supervisor will then transpose their overall rating of the individual on each competency into the appropriate space. The supervisor then captures three to five comments about individual strengths the person demonstrated over the past year and three to five areas in need of improvement in the appropriate spaces of the PMSF. The individual being evaluated gets the opportunity to make additional comments on the PMSF and then the supervisor and individual both sign the document to acknowledge the annual review took place and that a feedback session on the evaluation took place.

CCWRC Performance Management Procedures for CCWRC Full and Part-time Employees

  • Responsibilities of the Rater:
    • The rater of any person at the CCWRC should be the person most familiar with day-to-day performance of the person being rated.
    • The rater should be the person primarily responsible for assigning tasks to the person being rated.
    • The performance management system involves the following:
  • Goal-Setting Meeting: Within the first 30 days of a new hire joining the CCRWC, the new hire’s rater must conduct an initial face-to-face discussion to establish an initial set of goals for the ratee. These goals will be mutually discussed and developed to help the ratee understand the  work priorities for the next rating period.
    • Use the CCWRC Goal Sheet (Page 1) to document the goals and keep them on file. The rater will file a copy of the agreed upon goals for their records and provide a copy to the ratee for their records. (See Appendix A)
    • The initial face-to-face meeting should incorporate a discussion of the job descriptions and both the rater and ratee should develop a mutual understanding of what the ratee will accomplish in the position during the following evaluation period.
    • After the first goal setting meeting, the procedures for establishing goals for the next rating period will take place during the ratee’s annual performance management evaluation meeting.
  • Performance Progress Review: During the course of the evaluation period, the rater will utilize Page 2 of the CCWRC PMT Goal Sheet to document key points of note that capture important examples of the ratee’s performance and progress towards goal accomplishment.
    • The documentation of performance throughout the rating period is key to successfully providing feedback and providing sufficient examples to support performance ratings during the six-month review and at the end of the evaluation period.
  • Formal Performance Review: At the six-month point of the ratee’s evaluation period, the rater and the ratee will have a face-to-face meeting to review the ratee’s performance to date. At a minimum, the rater will review the initial goal sheet with the ratee and document their observations of the ratee’s performance to date. The purpose of this meeting is to give the ratee formal feedback, review and adjust goals if necessary, and ensure there is a mutual understanding of the rater’s perceptions of the ratee’s performance over the six-month period. Any disagreements should be discussed and documented on Page 3 of the CCWRC PMT Goal Sheet.
    • During a new hire’s first evaluation period, they will receive a complete informal evaluation of their performance using the goal sheets previously described and an initial informal evaluation using the appropriate Performance Management Tool (PMT) for their position. The more thorough review of performance at the six-month point is only required during the inaugural evaluation period at the CCWRC. See below for a full description of the PMT procedures for employees that are not new hires.
  • The Annual Performance Evaluation: As previously stated, the performance evaluations for CCWRC members will take place annually, based on a person’s date of hire. Raters, however, can reschedule an evaluation one month earlier or later to avoid too many overlapping evaluations being due at the same time. A rater must first obtain approval from their supervisor before altering the timing of performance evaluations.
    • In preparation for receiving their annual review, the ratee will prepare a personal evaluation/summary of their performance accomplishments over the past year using Page 4 of the CCRWC PMT Goal Setting Form to the rater. The rater will consider the ratee’s submission as they fill out the individual’s annual review.
    • Three weeks prior to the annual review meeting, the rater will request feedback on the ratee’s performance from the approved 360 degree feedback list. The rater will request that all people on the feedback list utilize the 360 Degree Feedback Form to submit their comments.
    • The rater will provide a DRAFT copy of the PMT Form to the ratee 24 to 48 hours before their face-to-face meeting. This will give both parties the opportunity to review the form before the formal meeting.
      • Reminder: This is a developmental process. The goal is to help others to improve. If either party has concerns with the feedback, they must discuss it during the PMT face-to-face meeting.
    • During the face-to-face meeting, the rater will review the key points of the PMT Form with the ratee and  provide her/him the opportunity to ask questions. The ratee can request 24 to 48 hours to make a statement on the last page of the PMT Form before signing the form.
    • After the PMT Tool and Summary Form have been reviewed by both parties, the rater will provide the ratee with a copy for their records and will also file a copy of the completed form with the CCWRC.
    • After the review of the PMT Form, the rater and the ratee will complete Page 1 of the CCRWC PMT Goal Setting Form for the next years evaluation period.
      • Note: It is important that this document is completed at this time to ensure key points discussed during the review of the PMT Form are incorporated into the next evaluation period goals.
  • If the rater is leaving the CCWRC, an evaluation should be provided prior to the rater’s departure whenever possible, pending 90 or more days have transpired since the last evaluation.
    • If it is not possible for the rater to evaluate the ratee before their departure, the incoming rater will conduct the performance evaluation on the schedule planned by the previous rater.
    • For example, if a ratee was not evaluated prior to their previous rater’s departure, the ratee would be due to receive an evaluation in six months. The evaluation would occur as planned with the new rater using the notes from the previous rater, the 360 feedback, and the individual’s self-evaluation to provide as thorough feedback as possible.
  • Responsibilities of the Ratee:
    • From the ratee’s perspective the use of the performance management system will take place on the following basis:
  • Goal-Setting Meeting: Within the first 30 days of a new hire joining the CCRWC the new hire should expect an initial face-to-face discussion with their rater to establish an initial set of goals for the next year at the CCWRC. These goals will be a mutually discussed and developed set of goals that help the ratee understand their priorities of work for the next rating period. The ratee should be thinking about their goals based on their job description and personal goals.
    • The ratee should review the CCWRC Goal Sheet Page 1 and be prepared to discuss goals with their rater during the goal setting meeting . The ratee should ask for a copy of the the agreed upon goals for their records after the meeting.
    • If the initial face-to-face meeting does not include a discussion of the job descriptions and the ratee should ask the rater about the job description. It is critical that the ratee has a full understanding of their specific position after the goal setting meeting.
    • After the first rating period, the ratee should expect the goal setting discussion to occur during their formal annual performance review.
  • Performance Progress Review: During the course of the evaluation period, the ratee should maintain a list of notes that document their many accomplishments over the course of the rating period. This will make it much easier to fill out the Personal Evaluation Form on Page 4 of the CCWRC PMT Support Forms.
  • Formal Performance Review: At the six-month point of the ratee’s evaluation period, the rater and the ratee will have a face-to-face meeting to review the ratee’s performance to date. At a minimum, the ratee should be prepared to discuss their progress toward the accomplishment of their initial goals. The ratee should also be prepared to discuss any questions about the expectations of their rater if they need additional clarity.  If there are specific points of discussion the ratee would like documented, the ratee should ask the rater to capture them on Page 3 of the CCWRC PMT Support Forms.
  • The Annual Performance Evaluation:  In preparation for receiving their annual review, the ratee will prepare a personal evaluation/summary of their performance accomplishments over the past year using page 4 of the CCRWC PMT Support Forms. The submission of this form is the ratee’s opportunity to ensure their supervisor is aware of all their major accomplishments over the past year. This form is due to the rater no later than two-weeks prior to their annual performance review with their rater.
    • The ratee can also identify specific CCWRC Staff they feel can provide insight into their performance over the past year. The rater will provide a DRAFT copy of the PMT Form to the ratee 24 to 48 hours before their face-to-face meeting. This will give both parties the opportunity to review the form before their formal meeting.
      • Reminder: This is a developmental process. The goal is to help others to improve. If either party has an issue with the form, they must discuss it during the PMT face-to-face meeting.
    • During the face-to-face meeting, the ratee will review the key points of the PMT Form with the rater and ask the rater any questions they might have. The ratee should request 24 to 48 hours to make a statement on the last page of the PMT Form before signing the form if they do not agree with the evaluation or if they feel some critical piece of information is not included in the document.
    • After reviewing the PMT Form, the rater and ratee will complete Page 1 of the CCRWC PMT Goal Setting Form for the next evaluation period.
      • Note: It is important that this document is completed at this time to ensure key points discussed during the review of the PMT Form are incorporated into the next evaluation period goals.

CCWRC Performance Management Procedures for CCWRC Volunteers

  • The performance management process for the CCWRC volunteers is driven primarily by self evaluations.
  • Responsibilities of the Rater:
    • The rater of volunteer performance is responsible for tracking the evaluation periods for all the volunteers.
    • The rater must provide all volunteers with the necessary documents needed to conduct the review.
    • The evaluation of the volunteer’s performance will be done on a yearly basis following an initial six-month evaluation at the beginning of their association with the CCWRC.
    • The rater will let the volunteers know when they are required to submit the Volunteer PMT.
    • Once the rater receives the initial Volunteer PMT Self Evaluation, the rater will review the self evaluation and summarize the information on the Volunteer Summary Form.
    • The rater will also include any other relevant information in the appropriate box on the Volunteer Summary Form.
    • The rater will then set-up a meeting with the volunteer to discussion the summary of the information included in the Volunteer PMT.
      • Face-to face meetings are preferred, but given the nature of the volunteering situation at the CCWRC, phone meetings are acceptable.
  • Responsibilities of the Volunteer:
    • All CCWRC Volunteers are required to conduct a self evaluation of their performance at the initial six-month mark of their association with the CCWRC and on an annual basis thereafter.
    • The volunteer is responsible for working with their rater to establish a discussion of the Volunteer Performance Summary in a timely manner.
    • Volunteers should be prepared to discuss any issues or concerns that they have about their ability to volunteer or the resources required to execute their duties as a volunteer. This includes but is not limited to: access to necessary resources, effectiveness of their training, or issues with other volunteers they are partnered with during their volunteer shifts.

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Project Management Tool Templates

Administration PMT
Client Services PMT
Client Support – Admin Assistant PMT
Client Support – Bookkeeper PMT
Client Support – Legal PMT
Client Support – Outreach PMT
Volunteer PMT
Support Forms

Position Recommended 360 Contributors

ADMINSTRATION
Executive Director
CFO
COO
All Team Project Directors

Shelter Director
Entire shelter team
All other directors
Bookkeeper
Admin Assistant

Director of Admin
CFO
Admin Assistant
All other directors, but most interaction with shelter director and director of counseling and advocacy

Chief Financial Officer
COO
Admin Assistant
Bookkeeper
All other directors

Director of Counseling and Advocacy
COO
Admin Assistant
Sexual Assault Counselor
Counselor/Legal Advocate
VCICM Advocate
Children’s Advocacy Center Advocate/Legal Advocate
Maybe Paralegal
Maybe Director of CLRP

Director of Volunteer Programs
COO
CFO
Directors of Shelter
Counseling and Advocacy
Assistant Director of Shelter
Volunteer staff

Shelter Director
Entire shelter team
All other directors
Bookkeeper
Admin Assistant

CCWRC SUPPORT SERVICES
Director of CLRP
Executive Director
Assistant Executive Director
Other directors
Paralegal (not from survey, but good for subordinate feedback)
Advocate staff (to a lesser extent)

Director of Outreach
Executive Director
Asst Executive Director
Prevention Educator
Administrative Assistant

Administrative Assistant
Executive Director
Assistant Executive Director
Bookkeeper
Director of Volunteer Programs
Director of Counseling and Advocacy
Shelter Staff
Any CCWRC member

Bookkeeper
CFO
Administrative Assistant
Executive Director
Assistant Executive Director
Shelter Director (general feedback)
CAS staff member (general feedback)
Any director or non-exempt staff member (due to payroll-related interactions)

Paralegal
Director of Counseling and Advocacy
Executive Director
Asst. Executive Director
Other CCWRC directors

Prevention Educator
Director of Outreach
Executive Director
Asst. Executive Director
Other Prevention Educators

CLIENT SERVICES
Child Advocate/Parent Counselor
Overnight and Weekend Staff
Assistant Shelter Director
Counseling and Advocacy Director
Volunteer Coordinator
Shelter Director
Shelter Counselor
Executive Director

Assistant Shelter Director
Entire Shelter Team
Other directors
Co-facilitators of group (currently one of the legal advocates)

CAC Advocate and Supervised Visitation Monitor
CAC Director
Visitation and Exchange Advocate
Supervised Visitation Monitor
CAC Volunteers
Members of committees the visitation and exchange advocate participates on
Direct supervisor of CAC

Counselor and Legal Advocate
CAST Supervisor
Counseling Team
Assistant Executive Director

SA Counselor and Legal Advocate
CAST Supervisor
Counseling Team
Assistant Executive Director

Shelter Counselor
Overnight and Weekend Staff
Assistant Shelter Director
Counseling and Advocacy Director
Assistant Executive Director
Volunteer Coordinator
Shelter Director
Shelter Counselor
Executive Director

Transitional Housing Advocate
Overnight and Weekend Staff
Assistant Shelter Director
Counseling and Advocacy Director
Assistant Executive Director
Volunteer Coordinator
Shelter Director
Shelter Counselor
Executive Director
Children’s Advocate/Parent Counselor

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